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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine survival times in dogs with right atrial hemangiosarcoma treated by means of pericardectomy and tumor resection, with or without adjuvant chemotherapy, and identify complications associated with treatment.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—23 dogs.

Procedure—Dogs were included only if the diagnosis was confirmed histologically.

Results—The most common initial complaints included acute collapse (8 [35%] dogs), anorexia or inappetence (8 [35%]), and lethargy (8 [35%]). The most common physical examination abnormalities included muffled heart sounds (12 [52%] dogs), tachycardia (7 [30%]), and weak pulses (7 [30%]). Postoperative complications developed in 12 (52%) dogs; however, most complications were minor. Twenty (87%) dogs were discharged from the hospital. Survival time was significantly longer in the 8 dogs that received adjuvant chemotherapy (mean, 164 days; median, 175 days) than in the 15 dogs that did not receive chemotherapy (mean, 46 days; median, 42 days). Dogs that received chemotherapy were significantly younger and had significantly lower WBC counts than did dogs that did not receive chemotherapy.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that in dogs with right atrial hemangiosarcoma, surgical resection of the tumor was associated with a low complication rate and complications that did arise typically were minor. In addition, use of adjuvant chemotherapy following resection was associated with significantly longer survival times, compared with resection alone. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226:575–579)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine toxic effects of streptozocin given in combination with a diuresis protocol in dogs and establish whether streptozocin is efficacious in treatment of pancreatic islet cell tumors in dogs.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—17 dogs.

Procedure—Medical records were reviewed to obtain information regarding signalment, tumor stage and staging tests performed, number of streptozocin treatments, adverse effects, results of biochemical and hematologic monitoring during streptozocin treatment, tumor dimensions, duration of normoglycemia, and date of death, when applicable. Dogs were compared with a historical control group of 15 dogs treated surgically and medically.

Results—58 treatments were administered to the 17 dogs. Only 1 dog developed azotemia. Serum alanine aminotransferase activity increased in some dogs but decreased when treatment was discontinued. Hematologic toxicoses were rare. Vomiting during administration was uncommon but occasionally severe. Two dogs developed diabetes mellitus after receiving 5 doses. Median duration of normoglycemia for 14 dogs with stage-II or -III insulinoma treated with streptozocin was 163 days (95% confidence interval, 16 to 309 days), which was not significantly different from that for the control dogs (90 days; 95% confidence interval, 0 to 426 days). Two dogs had rapid resolution of paraneoplastic peripheral neuropathy, and 2 others had measurable reductions in tumor size.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that streptozocin can be administered safely to dogs at a dosage of 500 mg/m2, IV, every 3 weeks when combined with a protocol for induction of diuresis and may be efficacious in the treatment of dogs with metastatic pancreatic islet cell tumors. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;221:811–818)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objectives

To determine systemic and local platinum concentrations released from subcutaneously implanted cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (cisplatin)-impregnated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and to evaluate systemic or local adverse reactions.

Animals

6 healthy dogs.

Procedure

Cisplatin (20 mg) was inserted into PMMA that was fashioned into cylinders and placed into subcutaneous tissue chambers overlying the thorax (treated site). An empty tissue chamber was placed over the opposite side (control site). Plasma samples were obtained for platinum determination before implantation, at 3, 6, and 12 hours after implantation on day 0, and once daily on days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 29. At similar times on similar days, tissue chamber fluid samples also were obtained for platinum determination. Complete blood count, serum urea nitrogen and creatinine concentration determinations, and urinalyses were performed on days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 29. Complete necropsy was performed at conclusion of the study.

Results

Tissue chamber platinum concentrations at the treated site were significantly greater than plasma and control site tissue chamber concentrations on days 2, 3, 7, 10. Mean plasma platinum concentration at 3 (0.735 µg/ml), 6 (0.691 µg/ml), 12 (0.534 µg/ml), 24 (0.131 µg/ml), 48 (0.2 µg/ml), 72 (0.1 µg/ml), and 158 (0.014 µg/ml) hours was significantly greater than pretreatment values (0.0 µg/ml). Plasma platinum concentration 10 days after treatment (0.011 µg/ml) did not significantly differ from pretreatment values. Local or systemic adverse reactions were not apparent.

Conclusions

The route of cisplatin administration was safe. Greater concentration of platinum was released locally relative to plasma concentration for an extended period. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:280–283)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research