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Abstract

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs work through inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) and are highly effective for the treatment of pain and inflammation in horses. There are 2 clinically relevant isoforms of COX. Cyclooxygenase-1 is constitutively expressed and is considered important for a variety of physiologic functions, including gastrointestinal homeostasis. Thus, NSAIDs that selectively inhibit COX-2 while sparing COX-1 may be associated with a lower incidence of adverse gastrointestinal effects. Various formulations of firocoxib, a COX-2-selective NSAID, labeled for use in horses are available in the United States. Equine practitioners should know that the FDA limits the use of firocoxib to formulations labeled for horses, regardless of price concerns. In addition, practitioners will benefit from understanding the nuances of firocoxib administration, including the importance of correct dosing and the contraindications of combining NSAIDs. Together with knowledge of the potential advantages of COX-2 selectivity, these considerations will help veterinarians select and treat patients that could benefit from this new class of NSAID.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the degree of histomorphometric damage in dorsal colon and pelvic flexure biopsy specimens (DCBSs and PFBSs, respectively) obtained from horses with large colon volvulus (LCV) and assess the accuracy of predicting short-term outcome for those horses on the basis of DCBS or PFBS characteristics.

ANIMALS

18 horses with ≥ 360° LCV that underwent large colon resection.

PROCEDURES

During surgery, biopsy specimens from the dorsal colon resection site and the pelvic flexure (when available) were collected from each horse. Interstitial-to-crypt (I:C) ratio (ratio of the lamina propria space occupied by the interstitium to that occupied by crypts), hemorrhage within the lamina propria (mucosal hemorrhage score [MHS] from 0 to 4), and percentage losses of glandular and luminal epithelium were determined in paired biopsy specimens and compared to determine optimal cutoff values for calculating the accuracy of DCBS and PFBS characteristics to predict short-term outcome (survival or nonsurvival after recovery from surgery).

RESULTS

Paired biopsy specimens were obtained from 17 of the 18 horses. The I:C ratio and percentage glandular epithelial loss differed between DCBSs and PFBSs. For DCBSs, an I:C ratio ≥ 0.9 and MHS ≥ 3 each predicted patient nonsurvival with 77.8% accuracy. For PFBSs, an I:C ratio ≥ I and MHS ≥ 3 predicted patient nonsurvival with 70.6% and 82.4% accuracy, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Although different, histomorphometric measurements for either DCBSs or PFBSs could be used to accurately predict short-term outcome for horses with LCV that underwent large colon resection, and arguably PFBSs are easier to collect.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate potential equine clients’ perceptions of equine veterinarians based on attire.

SAMPLE

763 horse owners/lessees.

METHODS

Participants were invited to complete a survey shared mainly via equestrian social media pages between August and October 2022. 1–3 Survey participants were shown pictures of a male veterinarian and a female veterinarian in 7 outfits ranging from casual to business attire and were asked to score the veterinarian on 7 traits: easygoing attitude, friendliness, compassion, trustworthiness, professionalism, competence, and cost of services. The survey asked which of the traits were most valued in an equine veterinarian, as well as whether various aspects of appearance including tattoos, piercings, and hair dyed a nonorganic color were acceptable for equine veterinarians.

RESULTS

Of the 2,655 individuals who opened the survey, 763 responses were included. Respondents were predominantly female (743/763 [97.4%]) from rural areas (493/763 [64.6%]). Only 37.1% (283/763) of respondents agreed that what a veterinarian wears influences their confidence in them. The highest-ranked traits in an equine veterinarian were knowledge/competency (mean ± SD, 1.46 ± 0.98), followed by trustworthiness (2.34 ± 1.08) and compassion (3.50 ± 1.20), with coveralls and scrubs being the preferred attire clients associated with these attributes (with the exception of compassion, for which polo shirt/jeans was the preferred attire). T-shirt/jeans was consistently ranked lowest by respondents in association with these attributes, except in the area of compassion, where polo shirt/black pants was ranked lowest.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Our findings suggested the attire and appearance of equine veterinarians can impact client perceptions, with veterinarians wearing scrubs and coveralls associated with higher competency and trustworthiness.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association