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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate factors associated with second remission in dogs with lymphoma retreated with a cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) protocol after relapse following initial treatment with a first-line 6-month CHOP protocol.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—95 dogs with lymphoma.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed. Remission duration was estimated by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Factors potentially associated with prognosis were examined.

Results—Median remission duration after the first-line CHOP protocol was 289 days (range, 150 to 1,457 days). Overall, 78% (95% confidence interval [CI], 69% to 86%) of dogs achieved a complete remission following retreatment, with a median second remission duration of 159 days (95% CI, 126 to 212 days). Duration of time off chemotherapy was associated with likelihood of response to retreatment; median time off chemotherapy was 140 days for dogs that achieved a complete remission after retreatment and 84 days for dogs that failed to respond to retreatment. Second remission duration was associated with remission duration after initial chemotherapy; median second remission duration for dogs with initial remission duration ≥ 289 days was 214 days (95% CI, 168 to 491 days), compared with 98 days (95% CI, 70 to 144 days) for dogs with initial remission duration < 289 days.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Findings suggested that retreatment with the CHOP protocol can be effective in dogs with lymphoma that successfully complete an initial 6-month CHOP protocol.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effectiveness of masitinib for the treatment of nonresectable mast cell tumors (MCTs) in dogs at 12 and 24 months after onset of treatment.

Animals—132 dogs with nonresectable grade 2 or 3 MCTs.

Procedures—Dogs received masitinib (12.5 mg/kg/d, PO; n = 106) or a placebo (26). After 6 months, treatment was extended with tumor assessments at 3-month intervals until detection of disease progression. Endpoints were tumor response and overall survival rate and time.

Results—In dogs with nonresectable MCTs, masitinib significantly improved survival rate, compared with results for the placebo, with 59 of 95 (62.1%) and 9 of 25 (36.0%) dogs alive at 12 months and 33 of 83 (39.8%) and 3 of 20 (15.0%) dogs alive at 24 months, respectively. Median overall survival time was 617 and 322 days, respectively. Tumor control at 6 months had a high predictive value for 24-month survival, with high specificity (88%) and sensitivity (76%), whereas short-term tumor response (within 6 weeks) had a poor predictive value. Complete responses at 24 months were observed in 6 of 67 (9.0%) dogs with nonresectable MCTs treated with masitinib.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Masitinib significantly increased survival rates at 12 and 24 months in dogs with nonresectable MCTs. Control of disease at 6 months, but not best response at 6 weeks, was predictive of long-term survival in dogs treated with masitinib, which suggested that short-term response may be irrelevant for assessing clinical efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors for treatment of MCTs.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate factors associated with survival in dogs with nasal carcinomas that did not receive treatment or received only palliative treatment.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—139 dogs with histologically confirmed nasal carcinomas.

Procedures—Medical records, computed tomography images, and biopsy specimens of nasal carcinomas were reviewed. Only dogs that were not treated with radiation, surgery, chemotherapy, or immunotherapy and that survived ≥ 7 days from the date of diagnosis were included. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate survival time. Factors potentially associated with survival were compared by use of log-rank and Wilcoxon rank sum tests. Multivariable survival analysis was performed by use of the Cox proportional hazards regression model.

Results—Overall median survival time was 95 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 73 to 113 days; range, 7 to 1,114 days). In dogs with epistaxis, the hazard of dying was 2.3 times that of dogs that did not have epistaxis. Median survival time of 107 dogs with epistaxis was 88 days (95% CI, 65 to 106 days) and that of 32 dogs without epistaxis was 224 days (95% CI, 54 to 467 days).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The prognosis of dogs with untreated nasal carcinomas is poor. Treatment strategies to improve outcome should be pursued.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association