Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Alma Maciulis x
  • Refine by Access: Content accessible to me x
Clear All Modify Search

SUMMARY

The duration of the incubation period for scrapie, a fatal transmissible neurodegenerative disorder of sheep and goats, is mainly determined by the Sip gene, which has 2 alleles (sA—susceptible and pA—resistant). A diagnostic test is not available to detect scrapie in live animals. We analyzed genomic dna extracted from frozen sheep brains collected from Cheviot sheep of the United States that had been inoculated with the SSBP/1 scrapie inoculum. Digestion of the dna with EcoRI or HindIII followed by the addition of a scrapie-associated fibril protein (PrP)-specific marker probe, yielded fragments of 6.8 (e1) and 4.0 (e3) kb, or 5.0 (h1) and 3.4 (h2) kb, respectively. Fragments e1 and h2 were associated with the histopathologic diagnosis of scrapie, and fragments e3 and h1 were associated with survival. A valine/alanine polymorphism within the PrP coding region that resulted in a BspHI site was further used to determine the genotype of these Cheviot sheep. Digestion of polymerase chain reaction fragments with BspHI resulted in an undigested fragment b– (0.840 kb), digested fragments b+ (0.460 and 0.380 kb), or both types of fragments. Survival time of b+/b+ homozygous sheep was significantly (P < 0.01) shorter (218 ± 26.0 days) than survival time for b−/b− sheep (> 700 days after inoculation). Results indicated that b+ and b− are markers for the Sip sA and pA alleles, respectively. The intermediate duration of the incubation period for heterozygous sheep (b+/b−; 342.9 ± 25.3 days) indicated that the Sip sA allele is expressed codominantly to the Sip pA allele.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Reciprocal embryo transfers were made between scrapie-inoculated and scrapie-free sheep (Cheviot and Suffolk breeds) to measure scrapie transmission via the embryo (using offspring from embryos of scrapie-inoculated donors and scrapie-free recipients) and via the uterus (using offspring from embryos of scrapie-free donors and scrapie-inoculated recipients taken by cesarean section). Two control groups of offspring, 1 from scrapie-free parents (negative) and 1 from scrapie-inoculated parents (positive), also were included. All sheep were observed for clinical signs of scrapie until death or for a minimum of 60 months. Final diagnosis was made on the basis of histopathologic findings or results of mouse inoculation and/or proteinase-K-resistant protein analysis. Thirty to 61% of the scrapie-inoculated donor/recipient sheep within groups developed scrapie within 8 to 44 months after inoculation. None of the scrapie-free donor/recipients, including those gestating embryos from scrapie-inoculated donors, developed scrapie. Also, none of the offspring observed to ≥ 24 months of age from reciprocal cross, via embryo (0/67), or via the uterus (0/25), or from the negative-control group (0/33) developed scrapie. Fifty-six of the offspring via embryo, 19 of these via the uterus, and 31 negative controls survived to ≥ 60 months of age. Of the 21 sheep in the positive-control group, 2 (9.5%) developed scrapie, 1 at 31 months of age and 1 at 42 months of age. In the Cheviot offspring, the percentage of sheep carrying the short incubation allele ranged from 24 to 44% and the percentage in the Suffolk offspring ranged from 61 to 83%. These proportions indicate high degree of susceptibility to the disease. Results indicate that under the conditions of these experiments, scrapie was not transmitted to the offspring via the embryo or the uterus.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research