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Summary

Effects of the following treatments on abomasal and duodenal myoelectric activity in yearling cattle were studied: 2 ml of 0.9% sodium chloride solution (nacl); 0.07 mg of bethanechol (bet)/kg of body weight; 0.1 mg of metoclopramide (met)/kg; and 0.07 mg of bethanechol and 0.1 mg of metoclopramide (betmet)/kg. All treatments were administered SC during the early part of phase I of the migrating myoelectric complex. Myoelectric signals were recorded for 4 hours after administration of the treatments from 1 electrode in the antrum and 3 electrodes in the duodenum.

For the antral spike rate (asr), there was no significant difference among treatments during the first hour, but the asr was significantly (P < 0.05) greater during hours 2 to 4 after treatment with betmet, compared with asr. for met alone. The duodenal spike rate (dsr) was significantly (P < 0.05) greater during the first hour after administration of betmet than after the other treatments. After administration of BET, DSR was significantly (P < 0.05) greater than after met or nacl. There was no difference in dsr after met, compared with dsr after nacl. There was no significant difference in dsr among treatments during the second and third hours. The total antegrade propagating spike (tatp) count was greater after administration of betmet in all hours, compared with the other treatments. The ratio of taps to total spikes on the orad-most duodenal electrode was significantly (P < 0.05) greater after betmet during hours 1 and 2.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To develop a better system for classification of herd infection status for paratuberculosis (Johne's disease [JD]) in US cattle herds on the basis of the risk of potential transmission of Mycobacterium avium subsp paratubeculosis.

Sample—Simulated data for herd size and within-herd prevalence; sensitivity and specificity for test methods obtained from consensus-based estimates.

Procedures—Interrelationships among variables influencing interpretation and classification of herd infection status for JD were evaluated by use of simulated data for various herd sizes, true within-herd prevalences, and sampling and testing methods. The probability of finding ≥ 1 infected animal in herds was estimated for various testing methods and sample sizes by use of hypergeometric random sampling.

Results—2 main components were required for the new herd JD classification system: the probability of detection of infection determined on the basis of test results from a sample of animals and the maximum detected number of animals with positive test results. Tables were constructed of the estimated probability of detection of infection, and the maximum number of cattle with positive test results or fecal pools with positive culture results with 95% confidence for classification of herd JD infection status were plotted. Herd risk for JD was categorized on the basis of 95% confidence that the true within-herd prevalence was ≤ 15%, ≤ 10%, ≤ 5%, or ≤ 2%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Analysis of the findings indicated that a scientifically rigorous and transparent herd classification system for JD in cattle is feasible.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

The report provided here contains a simplified set of diagnostic testing recommendations. These recommendations were developed on the basis of research funded by the USDA–Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service–Veterinary Services through a cooperative agreement. The report is intended to provide simple, practical, cost-effective consensus testing recommendations for cattle herds that are not enrolled in the US Test-Negative Program. The information has been reviewed by paratuberculosis (Johne's disease) experts at the USDA and academic centers as well as stakeholders in various segments of the cattle industry. The recommendations were accepted by the National Johne's Working Group and Johne's Disease Committee of the US Animal Health Association during their annual meetings in October 2006.

The report is intended to aid veterinarians who work with cattle producers in the United States. The recommendations are based on information available up to October 2006. There is a paucity of large-scale, high-quality studies of multiple tests conducted on samples obtained from the same cattle. It is understood that there may be special circumstances that require deviation from these recommendations. Furthermore, as new information becomes available and assays are improved and their accuracy is critically evaluated, changes to these recommendations may be necessary.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the correlation between halftime of liquid-phase gastric emptying (T50), determined with nuclear scintigraphy using technetium Tc 99m pentetate, and absorption variables of orally administered acetaminophen.

Animals—6 mature horses.

Procedure—Technetium Tc 99m pentetate (10 mCi) and acetaminophen (20 mg/kg of body weight) were administered simultaneously in 200 ml of water. Serial left and right lateral images of the stomach region were obtained with a gamma camera, and T50 determined separately for counts obtained from the left side, the right side and the geometric mean. Power exponential curves were used for estimation of T50 and modified R2 values for estimation of goodness of fit of the data. Serial serum samples were taken, and acetaminophen concentration was determined, using fluorescence polarization immunoassay. Maximum serum concentration (Cmax), time to reach maximum serum concentration (Tmax), area under the curve for 240 minutes and the absorption constant (Ka) were determined, using a parameter estimation program. Correlations were calculated, using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient.

Results—Correlations between T50 and Tmax and between T50 and Ka were significant.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Tmax and Ka are valuable variables in the assessment of liquidphase gastric emptying using acetaminophen absorption. Acetaminophen absorption may be a valuable alternative to nuclear scintigraphy in the determination of gastric emptying rates in equine patients with normally functioning small intestine. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:310–315)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Electrodes were surgically implanted at 15-cm intervals in the jejunum and ileum of 4 healthy neonatal calves so that myoelectric activity could be recorded on 2 consecutive days. On the first day, each calf received a control treatment, and myoelectric activity was recorded for 340 minutes. Phase I was recorded for a mean of 175.8 ± 22.8 minutes (51.5%), phase II for 124 ± 27.4 minutes (36.5%), and phase III for 40.3 ± 6 minutes (11.9%). On the second day, each calf was treated with approximately 200 μg of heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) of Escherichia coli orally. All calves developed diarrhea after the administration of STa. Phase I was recorded for a mean of 92.5 ± 42.3 minutes (27.2%), phase II for 227.3 ± 52.5 minutes (66.9%), and phase III for 20.3 ± 11.4 minutes (6.0%). Increase in phase II and decrease in phases I and III after STa administration were significant (P < 0.05). Duration of the migrating myoelectric complex was longer after STa administration (median, 64 minutes), compared with the control treatment (median, 54 minutes). Minute rhythms, recorded on the day of toxin administration, ranged from 49 to 153 minutes. There was no difference between the number of migrating action potential complexes on the control days (range, 1 to 10), compared with those on treatment days (range, 1 to 14).

These findings are suggestive that enterotoxin-induced diarrhea of calves is accompanied by increased total spiking activity and minute rhythms in the distal portion of the jejunum and ileum.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

To evaluate the effect of ketoprofen on fecal output during secretory diarrhea, 16 calves were given approximately 200 μg of heat-stable Escherichia coli enterotoxin by suckling on 2 occasions. On one day, treatment was not administered. On the other day, either 3 mg of ketoprofen/kg of body weight (n = 8) or 6 mg of ketoprofen/kg (n = 8) was administered 1 hour before and 3 hours after administration of enterotoxin. Fecal output was no different after 8 or 24 hours from calves given 3 mg/kg, but fecal output was less at 8 hours and 24 hours for calves given 6 mg/kg (P = 0.0588), compared with the control day.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the use of sucrose permeability testing to detect ulcers in the gastric squamous mucosa of horses.

Animals—13 adult horses ranging from 5 to 19 years of age.

Procedure—Following induction of gastric ulcers by intermittent feed deprivation, horses underwent sucrose permeability testing (administration of sucrose by nasogastric intubation followed by collection of urine at 2 and 4 hours after intubation) and gastric endoscopy. Squamous ulcers were assigned a severity score (range, 0 to 3) by use of an established scoring system. Horses were subsequently administered omeprazole for 21 days, and sucrose testing and endoscopy were repeated. Pair-wise comparisons of urine sucrose concentration were made between horses with induced ulcers before and after omeprazole treatment. Urine sucrose concentrations also were compared on the basis of ulcer severity score.

Results—Urine sucrose concentrations and ulcer severity scores were significantly higher in horses with induced ulcers before omeprazole treatment than after treatment. Urine sucrose concentrations were significantly higher for horses with ulcer severity scores > 1. Use of a cut-point value of 0.7 mg/mL revealed that the apparent sensitivity and specificity of sucrose permeability testing to detect ulcers with severity scores > 1 was 83% and 90%, respectively. Results were similar after adjusting sucrose concentrations for urine osmolality.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Urine sucrose concentration appears to be a reliable but imperfect indicator of gastric squamous ulcers in horses. Sucrose permeability testing may provide a simple, noninvasive test to detect and monitor gastric ulcers in horses. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:31–39)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To estimate the prevalence of paratuberculosis in purebred beef cattle in Texas and identify risk factors for seropositivity.

Design—Epidemiologic survey.

Animals—4,579 purebred cattle from 115 beef ranches in Texas.

Procedure—Blood was collected, and serum was analyzed for antibodies with a commercial ELISA. Fecal samples were collected and frozen at −80°C until results of the ELISA were obtained, and feces from seropositive cattle were submitted for mycobacterial culture. Herd owners completed a survey form on management factors.

Results—Results of the ELISA were positive for 137 of the 4,579 (3.0%) cattle, and 50 of the 115 (43.8%) herds had at least 1 seropositive animal. Results of mycobacterial culture were positive for 10 of the 137 (7.3%) seropositive cattle, and 9 of the 50 (18%) seropositive herds had at least 1 animal for which results of mycobacterial culture were positive. Risk factors for seropositivity included water source, use of dairy-type nurse cows, previous clinical signs of paratuberculosis, species of cattle (Bos taurus vs Bos indicus), and location.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that seroprevalence of paratuberculosis among purebred beef cattle in Texas may be greater than seroprevalence among beef cattle in the United States as a whole; however, this difference could be attributable to breed or regional differences in infection rates or interference by cross-reacting organisms. Veterinarians should be aware of risk factors for paratuberculosis as well as the possibility that unexpected serologic results may be found in some herds. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226:773–778)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association