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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate pharmacokinetics of cefazolin after IV injection of cefazolin (22 mg/kg) and after simultaneous IV and IM injections of cefazolin (total dose, 44 mg/kg) to dogs.

ANIMALS 12 adult Beagles.

PROCEDURES Dogs (6/group) were assigned to receive a single injection of cefazolin (IV group; 22 mg/kg, IV) or simultaneous injections (IV + IM group; 22 mg/kg, IV, and 22 mg/kg, IM). Interstitial fluid was collected over a 5-hour period by use of ultrafiltration probes for pharmacokinetic analysis.

RESULTS Mean cefazolin concentration in the interstitial fluid at 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, and 5 hours after injection was 39.6, 29.1, 21.2, 10.3, 6.4, and 2.7 μg/mL, respectively, for the IV group and 38.3, 53.3, 46.4, 31.7, 19.1, and 8.9 μg/mL, respectively, for the IV + IM group. Mean area under the concentration-time curve extrapolated to infinity, maximum concentration, half-life, and time to maximum concentration was 74.99 and 154.16 h·μg/mL, 37.3 and 51.5 μg/mL, 0.96 and 1.11 hours, and 1.28 and 1.65 hours, respectively, for the IV and IV + IM groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Cefazolin concentrations in interstitial fluid of dogs were maintained at > 4 μg/mL for 4 hours after a single IV injection and for 5 hours after simultaneous IV and IM injections. Therefore, simultaneous IV and IM administration of cefazolin 30 to 60 minutes before surgery should provide interstitial fluid concentrations effective against the most common commensal organisms (Staphylococcus spp and Streptococcus spp) on the skin of dogs for surgical procedures lasting ≤ 4 hours.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To quantify plasma concentrations and determine adverse ocular, renal, or hepatic effects associated with repeated topical ophthalmic application of 0.1% diclofenac to healthy cats.

ANIMALS 8 healthy sexually intact male cats.

PROCEDURES A randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study was conducted. A topical formulation of 0.1% diclofenac was administered 4 times/d for 7 days to 4 cats, and artificial tear (control) solution was administered to the other 4 cats. After a 12-day washout period, cats received the other treatment. Ophthalmic examinations were performed daily. Plasma samples were obtained on days 1 and 7 for pharmacokinetic analysis. A CBC, serum biochemical analysis, urinalysis, determination of urine protein-to-creatinine ratio, and determination of glomerular filtration rate were performed before the start of the study and after each 7-day treatment period.

RESULTS Mild conjunctival hyperemia was the only adverse ocular effect detected. Maximal drug concentration and area under the curve were significantly higher on day 7 than on day 1. Diclofenac-treated cats had a significantly lower glomerular filtration rate than did control-treated cats after the second but not after the first treatment period, presumably associated with iatrogenic hypovolemia.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Topical ophthalmic administration of 0.1% diclofenac was well tolerated in healthy cats, with only mild signs of ocular irritation. Detectable systemic concentrations of diclofenac were achieved with accumulation over 7 days. Systemic absorption of diclofenac may be associated with reduced glomerular filtration rate, particularly in volume-contracted animals. Topical ophthalmic 0.1% diclofenac should be used with caution in volume-contracted or systemically ill cats.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To quantify plasma concentrations of prednisolone and dexamethasone (peripheral and jugular) and cortisol following topical ophthalmic application of 1% prednisolone acetate and 0.1% dexamethasone to healthy adult dogs.

ANIMALS

12 purpose-bred Beagles.

PROCEDURES

Dogs received 1 drop of 1% prednisolone acetate (n = 6) or neomycin polymyxin B dexamethasone (ie, 0.1% dexamethasone; 6) ophthalmic suspension in both eyes every 6 hours for 14 days. Blood samples (peripheral and jugular) were collected on days 0, 1, 7, and 14 and analyzed for plasma prednisolone and dexamethasone concentrations. Plasma cortisol concentrations were measured at the beginning of the study and following topical drug administration.

RESULTS

Both drugs demonstrated systemic absorption. Prednisolone was detected on days 1, 7, and 14 (median plasma concentration, 24.80 ng/mL; range, 6.20 to 74.00 ng/mL), and dexamethasone was detected on days 1, 7, and 14 (2.30 ng/mL; 0 to 17.70 ng/mL). Neither prednisolone nor dexamethasone were detected in plasma samples on day 0 (baseline). Sampling from the jugular vein resulted in higher plasma drug concentrations than from a peripheral vein when samples from each day were combined. Plasma cortisol concentrations were significantly lower than baseline following 14 days of treatment with topical prednisolone acetate and dexamethasone.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Prednisolone and dexamethasone are detected in the plasma of healthy dogs following topical ophthalmic administration 4 times/d with prednisolone concentrations being close to a physiologic dose of orally administered prednisolone. Additional research is needed to evaluate the systemic absorption of these medications in dogs with ocular inflammation.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the pharmacokinetics of hydromorphone hydrochloride after IV and IM administration in American kestrels (Falco sparverius).

Animals—12 healthy adult American kestrels.

Procedures—A single dose of hydromorphone (0.6 mg/kg) was administered IM (pectoral muscles) and IV (right jugular vein); the time between IM and IV administration experiments was 1 month. Blood samples were collected at 5 minutes, 1 hour, and 3 hours (n = 4 birds); 0.25, 1.5, and 9 hours (4); and 0.5, 2, and 6 hours (4) after drug administration. Plasma hydromorphone concentrations were determined by means of liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry, and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated with a noncompartmental model. Mean plasma hydromorphone concentration for each time was determined with naïve averaged pharmacokinetic analysis.

Results—Plasma hydromorphone concentrations were detectable in 2 and 3 birds at 6 hours after IM and IV administration, respectively, but not at 9 hours after administration. The fraction of the hydromorphone dose absorbed after IM administration was 0.75. The maximum observed plasma concentration was 112.1 ng/mL (5 minutes after administration). The terminal half-life was 1.25 and 1.26 hours after IV and IM administration, respectively.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated hydromorphone hydrochloride had high bioavailability and rapid elimination after IM administration, with a short terminal half-life, rapid plasma clearance, and large volume of distribution in American kestrels. Further studies regarding the effects of other doses, other administration routes, constantrate infusions, and slow release formulations on the pharmacokinetics of hydromorphone hydrochloride and its metabolites in American kestrels may be indicated.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the pharmacokinetics and safety of meloxicam in rabbits when administered orally for 29 days.

Animals—6 healthy rabbits.

Procedures—Meloxicam (1.0 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h) was administered to rabbits for 29 days. Blood was collected immediately before (time 0) and 2, 4, 6, 8, and 24 hours after drug administration on days 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29 to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of meloxicam. On day 30, an additional sample was collected 36 hours after treatment. Plasma meloxicam concentrations were quantified with liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry, and noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed. Weekly plasma biochemical analyses were performed to evaluate any adverse physiologic effects. Rabbits were euthanatized for necropsy on day 31.

Results—Mean ± SD peak plasma concentrations of meloxicam after administration of doses 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29 were 0.67 ± 0.19 μg/mL, 0.81 ± 0.21 μg/mL, 1.00 ± 0.31 μg/mL, 1.00 ± 0.29 μg/mL, and 1.07 ± 0.19 μg/mL, respectively; these concentrations did not differ significantly among doses 8 through 29. Results of plasma biochemical analyses were within reference ranges at all time points evaluated. Gross necropsy and histologic examination of tissues revealed no clinically relevant findings.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Plasma concentrations of meloxicam for rabbits in the present study were similar to those previously reported in rabbits that received 1. 0 mg of meloxicam/kg, PO every 24 hours, for 5 days. Results suggested that a dosage of 1. 0 mg/kg, PO, every 24 hours for up to 29 days may be safe for use in healthy rabbits.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine perioperative analgesia associated with oral administration of a novel methadone-fluconazole-naltrexone formulation in dogs undergoing routine ovariohysterectomy.

ANIMALS

43 healthy female dogs.

PROCEDURES

Dogs were randomly assigned to receive the methadone-fluconazole-naltrexone formulation at 1 of 2 dosages (0.5 mg/kg, 2.5 mg/kg, and 0.125 mg/kg, respectively, or 1.0 mg/kg, 5.0 mg/kg, and 0.25 mg/kg, respectively, PO, q 12 h, starting the evening before surgery; n = 15 each) or methadone alone (0.5 mg/kg, SC, q 4 h starting the morning of surgery; 13). Dogs were sedated with acepromazine, and anesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane. A standard ovariohysterectomy was performed by experienced surgeons. Sedation and pain severity (determined with the Glasgow Composite Pain Scale—short form [GCPS-SF]) were scored for 48 hours after surgery. Rescue analgesia was to be provided if the GCPS-SF score was > 6. Dogs also received carprofen starting the day after surgery.

RESULTS

None of the dogs required rescue analgesia. The highest recorded GCPS-SF score was 4. A significant difference in GCPS-SF score among groups was identified at 6:30 am the day after surgery, but not at any other time. The most common adverse effect was perioperative vomiting, which occurred in 11 of the 43 dogs.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Oral administration of a methadone-fluconazole-naltrexone formulation at either of 2 dosages every 12 hours (3 total doses) was as effective as SC administration of methadone alone every 4 hours (4 total doses) in dogs undergoing routine ovariohysterectomy. Incorporation of naltrexone in the novel formulation may provide a deterrent to human opioid abuse or misuse.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To assess the pharmacokinetics of nalbuphine HCl after IV and IM administration to Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis).

Animals—8 healthy adult Hispaniolan Amazon parrots of unknown sex.

Procedures—Nalbuphine HCl (12.5 mg/kg) was administered IV and IM to all birds in a complete randomized crossover study design; there was a washout period of 21 days between subsequent administrations. Plasma samples were obtained from blood collected at predetermined time points for measurement of nalbuphine concentration by use of liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by use of computer software.

Results—Nalbuphine was rapidly eliminated with a terminal half-life of 0.33 hours and clearance of 69.95 mL/min/kg after IV administration and a half-life of 0.35 hours after IM administration. Volume of distribution was 2.01 L/kg after IV administration. The fraction of the dose absorbed was high (1.03) after IM administration. No adverse effects were detected in the parrots during the study.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In Hispaniolan Amazon parrots, nalbuphine appeared to have good bioavailability after IM administration and was rapidly cleared after IV and IM administration. Safety and analgesic efficacy of various nalbuphine treatment regimens in this species require further investigation to determine the potential for clinical palliation of signs of pain in psittacine species.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the pharmacokinetics of nalbuphine decanoate after IM administration to Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis).

Animals—9 healthy adult Hispaniolan Amazon parrots of unknown sex.

Procedures—Nalbuphine decanoate (37.5 mg/kg) was administered IM to all birds. Plasma samples were obtained from blood collected before (time 0) and 0.25, 1, 2, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 96 hours after drug administration. Plasma samples were used for measurement of nalbuphine concentrations via liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated with computer software.

Results—Plasma concentrations of nalbuphine increased rapidly after IM administration, with a mean concentration of 46.1 ng/mL at 0.25 hours after administration. Plasma concentrations of nalbuphine remained > 20 ng/mL for at least 24 hours in all birds. The maximum plasma concentration was 109.4 ng/mL at 2.15 hours. The mean terminal half-life was 20.4 hours.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevanc e—In Hispaniolan Amazon parrots, plasma concentrations of nalbuphine were prolonged after IM administration of nalbuphine decanoate, compared with previously reported results after administration of nalbuphine hydrochloride. Plasma concentrations that could be associated with antinociception were maintained for 24 hours after IM administration of 37.5 mg of nalbuphine decanoate/kg. Safety and analgesic efficacy of nalbuphine treatments in this species require further investigation to determine the potential for clinical use in pain management in psittacine species.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of the injectable formulation of dexmedetomidine administered via the oral transmucosal (OTM) route to healthy dogs.

ANIMALS

6 healthy dogs.

PROCEDURES

Injectable dexmedetomidine was administered IV (5 μg/kg) or via the OTM route (20 μg/kg) in a blinded, single-observer, randomized crossover study. Dogs received dexmedetomidine and a sham treatment at each administration. Serial blood samples were collected from a catheter in a saphenous vein. Heart rate, respiratory rate, and subjective sedation score were assessed for 24 hours after administration. Plasma samples were analyzed for dexmedetomidine concentrations by use of ultraperformance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry.

RESULTS

For the OTM route, the mean ± SD maximum plasma concentration was 3.8 ± 1.3 ng/mL, which was detected 73 ± 33 minutes after administration. The mean maximum concentration for the IV dose, when extrapolated to the time of administration, was 18.6 ± 3.3 ng/mL. The mean terminal-phase half-life was 152 ± 146 minutes and 36 ± 6 minutes for OTM and IV administration, respectively. After IV administration, total clearance was 8.0 ± 1.6 mL/min/kg and volume of distribution at steady state was 371 ± 72 mL/kg. Bioavailability for OTM administration of dexmedetomidine was 11.2 ± 4.5%. Peak sedation scores did not differ significantly between routes of administration. Decreases in heart rate, respiratory rate, and peak sedation score were evident sooner after IV administration.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

OTM administration of the injectable formulation of dexmedetomidine resulted in a similar degree of sedation and prolonged duration of action, compared with results for IV administration, despite relatively low bioavailability.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research