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Objective

To determine whether peritoneal fluid pH, glucose concentration, and lactate dehydrogenase activity can be used to differentiate horses with septic peritonitis from those with nonseptic peritonitis.

Design

Prospective study.

Animals

46 horses, including 10 healthy horses, 15 horses with septic peritonitis, and 21 horses with nonseptic peritonitis.

Procedure

Peritoneal fluid and blood samples were analyzed for pH, glucose concentration, and lactate dehydrogenase activity. Complete blood cell counts were performed, and peritoneal fluid samples were submitted for bacterial culture.

Results

Horses with septic peritonitis had significantly lower peritoneal fluid pH and glucose concentrations than horses with nonseptic peritonitis and healthy horses. Compared with other tests, serum-to-peritoneal fluid glucose concentration differences > 50 mg/dl had the highest diagnostic use for detection of septic peritonitis. Peritoneal fluid pH < 7.3, glucose concentration < 30 mg/dl, and fibrinogen concentration > 200 mg/dl were also highly indicative of septic peritonitis.

Clinical Implications

Peritoneal fluid pH and glucose concentration can be used to assist in the identification of horses with septic peritonitis. These measurements can provide an early indication of sepsis, especially if cytologic evaluation of peritoneal fluid is unavailable or results are equivocal and peritoneal fluid bacterial culture results are pending. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;214: 1032–1036)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To compare the strength of the sutured linea alba, in vitro, using 2 suture patterns.

Animals

12 clinically normal llamas.

Procedure

2 incisions in the linea alba of 12 llamas were closed with a simple continuous or inverted cruciate pattern, and tissue was harvested after 10 days. In 6 llamas, the simple continuous line was intact; the inverted cruciate specimens contained 6 sutures. In 6 llamas, 1 knot was excised in the simple continuous pattern to simulate a failed line; the cruciate pattern contained 5 knots. Tissue sections were taken from cranial, between, and caudal to the linea alba incisions to compare fascial thickness. The sutured specimens were mounted in a mechanical testing system and tested to failure. A mixed-model ANOVA was used to evaluate the effects of suture pattern and incisional position on mechanical properties.

Results

Significant differences were not found between suture patterns or between location for yield force, failure force, or yield strain, whereas failure strain was lower for the intact simple continuous pattern than the inverted cruciate pattern (P = 0.003). From histomorphometric analysis, the caudal tissue specimens were significantly thinner than the middle tissue specimen cranial to the umbilicus (P = 0.006).

Conclusion

There was no significant difference in monotonic breaking strength of the linea alba sutured with the simple continuous or inverted cruciate pattern.

Clinical Relevance

These results justify the use of the simple continuous pattern over the cruciate pattern for ventral midline closure in llamas because of the ease of placement and speed. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:938–942)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To establish the route of infusion (IV or intraosseous) that results in the highest concentration of amikacin in the synovial fluid of the tibiotarsal joint and determine the duration of peak concentrations.

Animals—21 horses.

Procedure—Regional perfusion of a limb on 15 horses was performed. Amikacin sulfate was infused into the saphenous vein or via intraosseous infusion into the distal portion of the tibia (1 g in 56 ml of lactated Ringer's solution) or proximal portion of the metatarsus (1 g of amikacin in 26 ml of lactated Ringer's solution). Amikacin concentrations were measured in sequential samples from tibiotarsal joint synovial fluid and serum. Samples were obtained immediately prior to release of the tourniquet and 0.5, 1, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours after the tourniquet was released. Radiographic contrast material was infused into the same locations as the antibiotic perfusate to evaluate distribution in 6 other horses.

Results—Infusion into the saphenous vein produced the highest concentration of amikacin in the tibiotarsal joint, compared with the distal portion of the tibia (mean ± SE, 701.8 ± 366.8 vs 203.8 ± 64.5 µg/ml, respectively). Use of a lower volume of diluent in the proximal portion of the metatarsus produced a peak value of 72.2 ± 23.4 µg/ml.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—For regional perfusion of the tarsus, IV infusion is preferred to intraosseous infusion, because higher concentrations are achieved in the synovial fluid, and the procedure is easier to perform. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:374–380).

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research