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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To retrospectively evaluate neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) as a biomarker for severity and short-term outcomes of congestive heart failure (CHF) secondary to myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) in dogs.

ANIMALS

47 dogs with CHF secondary to MMVD, 47 dogs with presumptive preclinical MMVD, and 47 control dogs.

METHODS

Medical record data (signalment, physical examination findings, medical treatments instituted, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine MMVD stage, length of hospitalization, outcome, and hospital re-presentation due to CHF) from March 2012 through March 2022 for each dog were collected. Statistical analyses were performed with Mann-Whitney, Spearman correlation, and Fisher exact tests.

RESULTS

NLR (but not PLR) was significantly higher in dogs with CHF secondary to MMVD (6.41) compared to presumptive preclinical MMVD dogs (4.66; P < .001) and control dogs (3.95; P < .001). Dogs with higher NLR and PLR received significantly higher cumulative dosages of loop-diuretic therapy during hospitalization (ρ = 0.3, P = .04; and ρ = 0.4, P = .02, respectively). There was a positive association between NLR and duration of oxygen supplementation within the CHF group (ρ = 0.4; P = .01).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The increased diuretic dose and time receiving oxygen supplementation may represent increased disease severity for which NLR (and to a lesser extent PLR) may serve as a readily available marker. The data presented provide information regarding some of the systemic inflammatory changes seen in CHF secondary to MMVD in dogs. Future research should include prospective, longitudinal studies to provide insight into the long-term prognostic value of NLR and PLR in dogs with CHF.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To determine, among dogs with urolithiasis, whether dogs that had hyperadrenocorticism would be more likely to have calcium-containing uroliths than would dogs that did not have clinical evidence of hyperadrenocorticism.

Design

Retrospective case-control study.

Animals

20 dogs that had urolithiasis and hyperadrenocorticism and 42 breed-matched dogs that had urolithiasis but did not have clinical evidence of hyperadrenocortiosm.

Procedure

Signalment, urolith composition, results of bacterial culture of urine, and results of adrenal axis tests were recorded. A multivariate logistic regression model was created, including terms for age, sex, and hyperadrenocorticism. The outcome variable was presence or absence of calcium-containing uroliths.

Results

Among dogs with urolithiasis, those that had hyperadrenocorticism were 10 times as likely to have calcium-containing uroliths as were dogs that did not have clinical evidence of hyperadrenocorticism (odds ratio, 10.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.5 to 23.4) Neutered and sexually intact females were less likely to have calcium-containing uroliths than were neutered males (odds ratios, 0.041 [95% confidence interval, 0.0057 to 0.29] and 0.024 [95% confidence interval, 0.0012 to 0.5], respectively).

Clinical Implications

Prompt diagnosis and treatment of hyperadrenocorticism may decrease prevalence of calcium-containing uroliths in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998:212:1889–1891)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To identify risk factors associated with fatal acute pancreatitis in dogs.

Design

Case-control study.

Animals

70 case dogs with clinical evidence and histopathologic confirmation of fatal acute pancreatitis and 104 control dogs that had trauma, underwent necropsy, and did not have histologic evidence of acute pancreatitis.

Procedure

Information on signalment, weight, body condition, medical history, concurrent disease, and results of histopathologic examination was obtained by reviewing medical records. Logistic regression analysis included calculation of univariate and multivariate (adjusted) odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals.

Results and Clinical Implications

Dogs with fatal acute pancreatitis were largely middle- to older-aged dogs. Risk of developing fatal acute pancreatitis was increased by overweight body condition, diabetes mellitus, hyperadrenocorticism, hypothyroidism, prior gastrointestinal tract disease, and epilepsy. Additionally, Yorkshire Terriers were at increased risk, and Labrador Retrievers and Miniature Poodles were at decreased risk, of developing fatal acute pancreatitis. Males and neutered females appeared to have an increased risk of developing fatal acute pancreatitis, compared with sexually intact females. Thrombus formation was more likely in dogs that developed fatal acute pancreatitis than in control dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;214:46–51)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To determine clinical, clinicopathologic, radiographic, ultrasonographic, and coagulation abnormalities in dogs in which acute pancreatitis was fatal.

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

70 dogs.

Procedure

History, clinical signs, and physical examination findings at the time of initial evaluation at the veterinary teaching hospital; results of pretreatment laboratory tests, abdominal radiography, and ultrasonography; and histologic abnormalities were obtained from medical records.

Results

Clinical signs included anorexia, vomiting, weakness, diarrhea, polyuria and polydipsia, neurologic abnormalities, melena, weight loss, hematemesis, and passage of frank blood in feces. At the time of initial examination at the veterinary teaching hospital, 68 (97%) dogs were dehydrated, 18 (26%) were icteric, 22 (32%) were febrile, 40 (58%) had signs of abdominal pain, and 30 (43%) were classified as overweight or obese. Most dogs had leukocytosis, neutrophilia with a left shift, and thrombocytopenia. Various serum biochemical abnormalities were identified, including hypoglycemia, azotemia, hypercalcemia and other electrolyte abnormalities, hypoalbuminemia, high hepatic and pancreatic enzyme activities, hypercholesterolemia, and lipemia. For 17 of 28 (61 %) dogs, results of coagulation function tests were abnormal. Results of abdominal ultrasonography and radiography were consistent with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in 23 of 34 (68%) and 10 of 41 (24%) dogs, respectively. For 2 dogs, results of abdominal ultrasonography were not suggestive of acute pancreatitis, but results of abdominal radiography were.

Clinical Implications

Clinical signs and results of clinicopathologic tests are inconsistent. Abdominal ultrasonography may be valuable in the diagnostic evaluation of dogs suspected to have acute pancreatitis. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;213:665-670)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To characterize the clinical, clinicopathologic, and imaging findings in dogs with intestinal lymphangiectasia and to compare the histologic grade of lymphangiectasia with clinicopathologic and imaging abnormalities.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—17 dogs with a histologic diagnosis of intestinal lymphangiectasia.

Procedure—Medical records of dogs with a histologic diagnosis of intestinal lymphangiectasia were reviewed for signalment, history, clinical signs, results of exploratory laparotomy, and clinicopathologic, radiographic, ultrasonographic, and histologic findings.

Results—Mean age of dogs was 8.3 years; the most common clinical signs were diarrhea, anorexia, lethargy, vomiting, and weight loss. Abnormal physical examination findings included dehydration, ascites, and signs of pain on palpation of the abdomen. The most notable clinicopathologic findings were low serum ionized calcium concentration and hypoalbuminemia. Abdominal ultrasonography was performed in 12 dogs and revealed intestinal abnormalities in 8 dogs and peritoneal effusion in 7 dogs. Exploratory laparotomy revealed abnormalities in 9 of 16 dogs including thickened small intestine, dilated lacteals, lymphadenopathy, and adhesions. On histologic examination of the small intestine, concurrent inflammation was observed in 15 of 17 dogs, crypt ectasia in 5 of 17, and lipogranulomas in 2 of 17.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Intestinal lymphangiectasia in dogs appears to be a heterogeneous disorder characterized by various degrees of panhypoproteinemia, hypocholesterolemia, lymphocytopenia, and imaging abnormalities. In most dogs, the severity of hypoalbuminemia appears to offer the best correlation with severity of histologic lesions of lymphangiectasia. Imaging abnormalities are common in dogs with intestinal lymphangiectasia but are not specific enough to differentiate this disorder from other gastrointestinal disorders, nor are they predictive of histologic severity. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:197–202)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effects of diets differing in type and quantity of fiber on glycemic control in dogs with naturally occurring insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

Design—Prospective randomized crossover controlled trial.

Animals—7 dogs with well-regulated naturally occurring insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

Procedure—Dogs were fed 1 of 3 diets for 1 month each in 1 of 6 randomized diet sequences. Diets included a low-fiber diet (LF) and 2 high-fiber diets; 1 contained only insoluble fiber (HIF), and 1 contained soluble fiber in addition to insoluble fiber (HSF). Caloric intake was unchanged throughout the study. Glycemic control was assessed after each feeding trial by measuring serum fructosamine concentration and performing 5 serial measurements of blood glucose concentration every 2 hours after the morning feeding and insulin injection.

Results—Significant differences were not detected in body weight, required insulin dosage, or albumin concentration among dogs fed the HIF, HSF, and LF diets. Mean and maximum blood glucose concentrations and area under the blood glucose curve were significantly lower in dogs fed the HIF diet, compared with values in the same dogs fed the HSF or LF diet. Fructosamine concentration was significantly lower in dogs fed the HIF or HSF diet, compared with values in the same dogs fed the LF diet.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In dogs with naturally occurring insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, a dry, high insoluble-fiber diet may aid in glycemic control. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;216:1076–1081)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To characterize concurrent disorders in dogs with diabetes mellitus (DM).

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—221 dogs with DM.

Procedure—Medical records were reviewed, and clinical signs, physical examination findings, and results of clinicopathologic testing, urinalysis, aerobic bacterial culture of urine samples, coagulation testing, endocrine testing, histologic evaluation, diagnostic imaging, and necropsy were recorded.

Results—For most dogs, CBC results were normal. Common serum biochemical abnormalities included hypochloremia (127 dogs, 60%) and high alanine aminotransferase (163, 78%), aspartate aminotransferase (78, 71%), and alkaline phosphatase (188, 90%) activities. Venous pH and serum ionized calcium concentration were measured in 121 and 87 dogs, respectively, and were low in 56 (46%) and 41 (47%) dogs. Lipemia was observed in 92 (42%) dogs. Urine samples from 159 (72%) dogs were submitted for aerobic bacterial culture, and 34 (21%) yielded bacterial growth. Escherichia coli was the most commonly isolated organism. Thirty-six (16%) dogs had dermatitis or otitis. Hyperadrenocorticism was diagnosed in 51 (23%) dogs on the basis of clinical signs and results of a low-dose dexamethasone suppression test (41 dogs), an adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test (5), both tests (4), or histologic evaluation of necropsy specimens (1). Acute pancreatitis was diagnosed in 28 (13%) dogs. Eleven (5%) dogs had tumors for which a histologic diagnosis was obtained. Eight (4%) dogs were hypothyroid.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that dogs with diabetes mellitus may have many concurrent disorders. The most commonly identified concurrent disorders included hyperadrenocorticism, urinary tract infection, dermatitis, otitis, acute pancreatitis, neoplasia, and hypothyroidism. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:1166–1173)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association