Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 18 of 18 items for

  • Author or Editor: Harry W. Boothe x
  • Refine by Access: Content accessible to me x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate efficacy and safety of using transdermal fentanyl patches (TFP) for analgesia in cats undergoing onychectomy.

Design—Randomized controlled clinical trial.

Animals—45 client-owned cats weighing ≥ 2.7 kg (5.9 lb) undergoing onychectomy, onychectomy and ovariohysterectomy, or onychectomy and castration.

Procedure—Cats were randomly assigned to be treated with a TFP (25 µg/h) or butorphanol; TFP were applied a minimum of 4 hours before surgery (approx 8 hours prior to extubation). Rectal temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, force applied by the forelimbs, and serum fentanyl concentration were measured, and temperament, recovery, degree of sedation, severity of pain, severity of lameness, and appetite were scored before and periodically for up to 40 hours after surgery.

Results—Cats treated with a TFP had better recovery scores at 2 of 4 evaluation times, lower sedation scores at 2 of 8 evaluation times, and lower pain scores at 6 of 8 evaluation times, compared with cats treated with butorphanol. Use of a pressure-sensitive mat to evaluate force applied by the forelimbs did not reveal any differences between groups but did reveal a significant difference between preoperative and postoperative values. Mean ± SD serum fentanyl concentrations were 1.56 ± 1.08, 4.85 ± 2.38, 4.87 ± 1.56, and 4.35 ± 2.97 ng/ml approximately 8, 24, 32, and 48 hours, respectively, after TFP placement.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that use of a TFP (25 µg/h) for postoperative analgesia in cats undergoing onychectomy with or without surgical sterilization is safe and effective. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:1013–1020)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate differences in bacterial numbers, identity, and susceptibility in samples obtained from the tympanic cavity on entry (preflush) and after evacuation and lavage (postflush) and assess perioperative and empiric antimicrobial selection in dogs that underwent total ear canal ablation (TECA) with lateral bulla osteotomy (LBO) or reoperation LBO.

Design—Prospective clinical study.

Animals—34 dogs.

Procedure—TECA with LBO or reoperation LBO was performed on 47 ears. Pre- and postflush aerobic and anaerobic samples were obtained from the tympanic cavity. Isolates and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were compared.

Results—Different isolates (31/44 [70%] ears) and susceptibility patterns of isolate pairs (6/44 [14%] ears) were detected in pre- and postflush samples from 84% of ears. Evacuation and lavage of the tympanic cavity decreased the number of bacterial isolates by 33%. In 26% of ears, bacteria were isolated from postflush samples but not preflush samples. Only 26% of isolates tested were susceptible to cefazolin. At least 1 isolate from 53% of dogs that received empirically chosen antimicrobials postoperatively was resistant to the selected drugs. Anaerobic bacteria were recovered from 6 ears.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Accurate microbiologic assessment of the tympanic cavity should be the basis for selection of antimicrobials in dogs undergoing TECA with LBO. Bacteria remain in the tympanic cavity after evacuation and lavage. Cefazolin was a poor choice for dogs that underwent TECA with LBO, as judged on the basis of culture and susceptibility testing results. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;227:748–755)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of treatment approach on outcome and the appropriateness of initial empirical antimicrobial treatment in dogs with pyothorax.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—46 dogs with pyothorax confirmed by either (n = 15) or both (31) of the following: intracellular bacteria in pleural fluid or tissue (41) and bacteria recovered via culture of pleural fluid (36).

Procedures—Medical records of dogs treated for pyothorax from 1983 through 2001 were reviewed. Data on signalment, history, clinical signs, and treatment and results of diagnostic imaging and cytologic and microbiological evaluations were obtained. Follow-up was performed via reexamination (n = 15) and contact with referring veterinarians (26) and owners (24).

Results—46 dogs were treated with at least 1 antimicrobial and thoracocentesis (n = 7; noninvasive group), a thoracostomy tube (26; invasive group) with or without pleural lavage and heparin, or a thoracotomy (13; surgical group) and thoracostomy tube with or without pleural lavage and heparin. Pyothorax recurred in 7 dogs, and 5 of the 7 died or were euthanatized. In the respective groups, the short-term survival rate was 29%, 77%, and 92% and the long-term survival rate was 29%, 71%, and 70%. Pleural lavage and heparin treatment increased the likelihood of short- and long-term survival. Results of antimicrobial susceptibility testing suggested empirical antimicrobial selection was associated with a 35% risk of inefficacy.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In the dogs with pyothorax in this study, favorable treatment effects were achieved with surgery (for short-term survival) and pleural lavage and heparin treatment (for short- and long-term survival). Findings failed to support the hypothesis that invasive (surgical) versus noninvasive treatment of pyothorax in dogs leads to a better long-term outcome.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Effects of vena caval banding on portal venous and vena caval hemodynamics were examined in 6 control dogs and in 10 dogs that had undergone attenuation (banding) of the abdominal part of the caudal vena cava and had dimethylnitrosamine-induced multiple portosystemic shunts (pss). Additionally, indocyanine green (icg) extraction and clearance after infusion to steady state were used to calculate hepatic plasma flow in these dogs. Sixteen dogs were randomly assigned to 2 groups: control (n = 6) or diseased(n= 10). Diseased dogs were administered dimethylnitrosamine (2 mg/kg, po, twice weekly) until multiple pss developed, as assessed by results of clinical laboratory tests, ultrasonography, and hepatic scintigraphy. Shunts were confirmed visually at celiotomy and by contrast portography. Venous pressures (caudal vena caval, portal, and hepatic) were recorded before and after vena caval banding for up to 7 days in dogs from both groups. Peritoneal cavity pressures were recorded in all dogs after closure of the body wall. To determine icg extraction and clearance, a bolus injection of icg (0.5 mg/kg, iv) was administered, followed by steady-state infusion of 0.097 mg/min. Extractions and clearances of icg were measured, and from these, hepatic plasma flow rates were determined immediately before and after banding and at 6 hours, 48 hours, and 7 days after banding.

The gradient (caudal vena caval pressure within 1 to 2 mm of Hg of portal pressure) between caudal vena cava and portal venous pressures established at banding was maintained after the first hour in both groups. Caudal vena cava pressures established at banding were maintained throughout the study, with the exception of the first hour in diseased dogs. Extraction ratios were higher in control dogs at all times, except at 48 hours. Clearance was higher in control dogs at all times. Hepatic plasma flow did not differ between groups, except immediately after banding, when flow was greater in diseased dogs, and differences were not found over time in either group. This study indicated that vena caval banding in this model of experimentally induced multiple pss increases and maintains caudal vena cava pressure, relative to portal venous pressure (after the first hour) for 7 days, and that calculated hepatic plasma flow is not persistently improved by vena caval banding.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine long-term results and complications of gonadectomy performed at an early age (prepubertal) or at the traditional age in dogs.

Design—Cohort study.

Animals—269 dogs from animal shelters.

Procedure—Dogs that underwent gonadectomy were allotted to 2 groups on the basis of estimated age at surgery (traditional age, ≥ 24 weeks old; prepubertal, < 24 weeks old). Adoptive owner information was obtained from shelter records, and telephone interviews were conducted with owners to determine physical or behavioral problems observed in the dogs since adoption. Follow-up information was obtained from attending veterinarians for dogs with complex problems or when owners were uncertain regarding the exact nature of their dog's problem.

Results—Prepubertal gonadectomy did not result in an increased incidence of behavioral problems or problems associated with any body system, compared with traditional-age gonadectomy, during a median follow-up period of 48 months after gonadectomy. Rate of retention in the original adoptive household was the same for dogs that underwent prepubertal gonadectomy as those that underwent traditional- age gonadectomy. Infectious diseases, however, were more common in dogs that underwent prepubertal gonadectomy.

Conclusions and Clinical Implications—With the exception of infectious diseases, prepubertal gonadectomy may be safely performed in dogs without concern for increased incidence of physical or behavioral problems during at least a 4-year period after gonadectomy. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218: 217–221)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine long-term results and complications of gonadectomy performed at an early age (prepubertal) or at the traditional age in cats.

Design—Cohort study.

Animals—263 cats from animal shelters.

Procedure—Cats that underwent gonadectomy were allotted to 2 groups on the basis of estimated age at surgery (traditional age, ≥ 24 weeks old; prepubertal, < 24 weeks old). Adoptive owner information was obtained from shelter records, and telephone interviews were conducted with owners to determine physical or behavioral problems observed in the cats after adoption. Follow-up information was obtained from attending veterinarians for cats with complex problems or when owners were uncertain regarding the exact nature of their cat's problem.

Results—Compared with traditional-age gonadectomy, prepubertal gonadectomy did not result in an increased incidence of infectious disease, behavioral problems, or problems associated with any body system during a median follow-up period of 37 months. Additionally, the rate of retention in the original adoptive household was the same for cats that underwent prepubertal gonadectomy as those that underwent traditional-age gonadectomy.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Prepubertal gonadectomy may be performed safely in cats without concern for increased incidence of physical or behavioral problems for at least a 3-year period after gonadectomy. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217: 1661–1665)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Case records of 37 cats with chylothorax examined at 2 institutions were retrospectively evaluated. Dyspnea and coughing were the most common abnormalities noticed by the owners, and most cats were dyspneic on initial examination. There was no statistically significant difference in the gender distribution of cats studied when compared with reference populations; however, purebred cats appeared to be overrepresented in the study population. Four of the cats had unilateral pleural effusion (2 left side, 2 right side) and 9 cats had effusions that were primarily, but not exclusively, on the right side. Surgery was performed on 20 cats. Fifteen cats underwent thoracic duct or cisterna chyli ligation; 20% had complete resolution of pleural fluid. There was no significant difference in the survival rate of cats that underwent thoracic duct ligation and those that were treated by other means. Six cats had mesenteric lymphangiography performed; 2 cats had normal results, and the remainder had various degrees of thoracic lymphangiectasia. Two cats in which pleuroperitoneal shunts were placed and 2 of 3 cats that underwent pleurodesis were euthanatized or died after surgery.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association