Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 41 items for

  • Author or Editor: Dawn M. Boothe x
  • Refine by Access: Content accessible to me x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether therapeutic concentrations of levetiracetam can be achieved in cats and to establish reasonable IV and oral dosing intervals that would not be associated with adverse effects in cats.

Animals—10 healthy purpose-bred cats.

Procedures—In a randomized crossover study, levetiracetam (20 mg/kg) was administered orally and IV to each cat. Blood samples were collected 0, 10, 20, and 40 minutes and 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 12, and 24 hours after administration. Plasma levetiracetam concentrations were determined via high-performance liquid chromatography.

Results—Mean ± SD peak concentration was 25.54 ± 7.97 μg/mL. The mean y-intercept for IV administration was 37.52 ± 6.79 μg/mL. Half-life (harmonic mean ± pseudo-SD) was 2.95 ± 0.95 hours and 2.86 ± 0.65 hours for oral and IV administration, respectively. Mean volume of distribution at steady state was 0.52 ± 0.09 L/kg, and mean clearance was 2.0 ± 0.60 mL/kg/min. Mean oral bioavailability was 102 ± 39%. Plasma drug concentrations were maintained in the therapeutic range reported for humans (5 to 45 μg/mL) for at least 9 hours after administration in 7 of 10 cats. Only mild, transient hypersalivation was evident in some cats after oral administration.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Levetiracetam (20 mg/kg) administered orally or IV to cats every 8 hours should achieve and maintain concentrations within the therapeutic range for humans. Levetiracetam administration has favorable pharmacokinetics for clinical use, was apparently tolerated well, and may be a reasonable alternative antiepileptic drug in cats.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To describe bacteria isolated from reproductive tracts of mares and to examine the extent and patterns of resistance to antimicrobials commonly used for treatment of endometritis.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Sample—8,296 uterine swab, lavage, or biopsy samples obtained between January 2003 and December 2008 from 7,665 horses in central Florida.

Procedures—Results of bacterial culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were obtained for uterine swab, lavage, and biopsy samples collected from mares undergoing a routine breeding examination or examined because of a reproductive disorder. Bacterial organisms were identified by means of standard techniques, and proportions of samples resistant to various antimicrobials were determined.

Results—At least 95% of samples (n = 1,451) were collected with uterine swabs. Potentially pathogenic organisms were cultured from 2,576 (31%) samples, with Escherichia coli (n = 729 [29%]) and β-hemolytic Streptococcus equi subsp zooepidemicus (733 [28%]) being most common. Resistance to antimicrobials changed over time for E coli, S equi subsp zooepidemicus, and Enterobacteriaceae isolates. Overall, E coli was most resistant to trimethoprim-sulfonamide and ampicillin and least to amikacin and enrofloxacin. For S equi subsp zooepidemicus, resistance was greatest to oxytetracycline and enrofloxacin and least to ceftiofur and ticarcillin with or without clavulanic acid. Inflammatory response was greater for S equi subsp zooepidemicus.

Conclusions and Clinical RelevanceE coli and S equi subsp zooepidemicus were the most common pathogens recovered from uterine samples, with S equi subsp zooepidemicus more commonly associated with inflammation. Antimicrobials most commonly used empirically to treat endometritis are appropriate on the basis of these data. However, as antimicrobial resistance changes over time, susceptibility assays should aid antimicrobial selection.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

Objective

To determine disposition of cyproheptadine hydrochloride in cats after intravenous or oral administration of a single dose.

Animals

6 healthy cats.

Procedure

A randomized crossover design was used, and each cat was studied after intravenous (2 mg) and oral (8 mg) administration of cyproheptadine. Blood samples were collected at fixed time intervals after drug administration, and serum cyproheptadine concentration was determined by means of polarized immunofluorescence.

Results

Mean (± SD) residence time was significantly longer after oral (823 ± 191 minutes) than after intravenous (339 ±217 minutes) administration, but no significant differences were detected between other pharmacokinetic parameters after oral and intravenous administration. Mean ± SD oral bioavailability was 1.01 ± 0.36. Mean elimination half-life after oral administration was 12.8 ± 9.9 hours. Peak extrapolated cyproheptadine concentration was 669 ± 206 ng/ml. Only 1 cat developed adverse effects (transient vocalization).

Conclusions

Cyproheptadine appeared to be well tolerated in cats and had high bioavailability after oral administration. The mean elimination half-life of 12 hours indicated that approximately 2.5 days must elapse to achieve steady-state concentrations of cyproheptadine after oral administration of multiple doses. A 12-hour dosing interval is acceptable, but an 8-hour interval may be indicated for some cats.

Clinical Relevance

On the basis of pharmacokinetic parameters determined in this study, the oral form of cyproheptadine appears to be suitable for use in clinical trials to treat anorexia in cats. Its half-life is compatible with once or twice daily dosing. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:79–81)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To document blood nitric oxide concentrations in the portal vein and systemic circulation in a rat model of acute portal hypertension and compare values with a control group and a sham surgical group.

Animals—30 rats; 10 controls (group 1), 10 sham surgical (group 2), and 10 rats with surgically induced acute portal hypertension (group 3).

Procedure—Following induction of anesthesia, catheters were placed surgically in the carotid artery, jugular, and portal veins of group 2 and 3 rats and in the carotid artery and jugular vein of group 1 rats. Baseline heart and respiratory rates, rectal temperature, and vascular pressure measurements were obtained, and blood was drawn from all catheters for baseline nitric oxide (NO) concentrations. Acute portal hypertension was induced in the group 3 rats by tying a partially occluding suture around the portal vein and a 22-gauge catheter. The catheter was then removed, resulting in a repeatable degree of portal vein impingement. After catheter placement, all variables were remeasured at 15-minute intervals for 3 hours.

Results—Blood nitric oxide concentrations were greater in all vessels tested in group 3 than in group 2 rats.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Acute portal hypertension in this experimental model results in increased concentrations of NO in the systemic and portal circulation. On the basis of information in the rat, it is possible that increased NO concentrations may develop in dogs following surgical treatment of congenital portosystemic shunts if acute life-threatening portal hypertension develops. Increased NO concentrations may contribute to the shock syndrome that develops in these dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1173–1177)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of treatment approach on outcome and the appropriateness of initial empirical antimicrobial treatment in dogs with pyothorax.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—46 dogs with pyothorax confirmed by either (n = 15) or both (31) of the following: intracellular bacteria in pleural fluid or tissue (41) and bacteria recovered via culture of pleural fluid (36).

Procedures—Medical records of dogs treated for pyothorax from 1983 through 2001 were reviewed. Data on signalment, history, clinical signs, and treatment and results of diagnostic imaging and cytologic and microbiological evaluations were obtained. Follow-up was performed via reexamination (n = 15) and contact with referring veterinarians (26) and owners (24).

Results—46 dogs were treated with at least 1 antimicrobial and thoracocentesis (n = 7; noninvasive group), a thoracostomy tube (26; invasive group) with or without pleural lavage and heparin, or a thoracotomy (13; surgical group) and thoracostomy tube with or without pleural lavage and heparin. Pyothorax recurred in 7 dogs, and 5 of the 7 died or were euthanatized. In the respective groups, the short-term survival rate was 29%, 77%, and 92% and the long-term survival rate was 29%, 71%, and 70%. Pleural lavage and heparin treatment increased the likelihood of short- and long-term survival. Results of antimicrobial susceptibility testing suggested empirical antimicrobial selection was associated with a 35% risk of inefficacy.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In the dogs with pyothorax in this study, favorable treatment effects were achieved with surgery (for short-term survival) and pleural lavage and heparin treatment (for short- and long-term survival). Findings failed to support the hypothesis that invasive (surgical) versus noninvasive treatment of pyothorax in dogs leads to a better long-term outcome.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Effects of vena caval banding on portal venous and vena caval hemodynamics were examined in 6 control dogs and in 10 dogs that had undergone attenuation (banding) of the abdominal part of the caudal vena cava and had dimethylnitrosamine-induced multiple portosystemic shunts (pss). Additionally, indocyanine green (icg) extraction and clearance after infusion to steady state were used to calculate hepatic plasma flow in these dogs. Sixteen dogs were randomly assigned to 2 groups: control (n = 6) or diseased(n= 10). Diseased dogs were administered dimethylnitrosamine (2 mg/kg, po, twice weekly) until multiple pss developed, as assessed by results of clinical laboratory tests, ultrasonography, and hepatic scintigraphy. Shunts were confirmed visually at celiotomy and by contrast portography. Venous pressures (caudal vena caval, portal, and hepatic) were recorded before and after vena caval banding for up to 7 days in dogs from both groups. Peritoneal cavity pressures were recorded in all dogs after closure of the body wall. To determine icg extraction and clearance, a bolus injection of icg (0.5 mg/kg, iv) was administered, followed by steady-state infusion of 0.097 mg/min. Extractions and clearances of icg were measured, and from these, hepatic plasma flow rates were determined immediately before and after banding and at 6 hours, 48 hours, and 7 days after banding.

The gradient (caudal vena caval pressure within 1 to 2 mm of Hg of portal pressure) between caudal vena cava and portal venous pressures established at banding was maintained after the first hour in both groups. Caudal vena cava pressures established at banding were maintained throughout the study, with the exception of the first hour in diseased dogs. Extraction ratios were higher in control dogs at all times, except at 48 hours. Clearance was higher in control dogs at all times. Hepatic plasma flow did not differ between groups, except immediately after banding, when flow was greater in diseased dogs, and differences were not found over time in either group. This study indicated that vena caval banding in this model of experimentally induced multiple pss increases and maintains caudal vena cava pressure, relative to portal venous pressure (after the first hour) for 7 days, and that calculated hepatic plasma flow is not persistently improved by vena caval banding.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine concentrations of marbofloxacin in alveolar macrophages (AMs) and epithelial lining fluid (ELF) and compare those concentrations with plasma concentrations in healthy dogs.

Animals—12 adult mixed-breed and purebred hounds.

Procedure—10 dogs received orally administered marbofloxacin at a dosage of 2.75 mg/kg every 24 hours for 5 days. Two dogs served as nontreated controls. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage procedures were performed while dogs were anesthetized with propofol, approximately 6 hours after the fifth dose. The concentrations of marbofloxacin in plasma and bronchoalveolar fluid (cell and supernatant fractions) were determined by use of high-performance liquid chromatography with detection of fluorescence.

Results—Mean ± SD plasma marbofloxacin concentrations 2 and 6 hours after the fifth dose were 2.36 ± 0.52 µg/mL and 1.81 ± 0.21 µg/mL, respectively. Mean ± SD marbofloxacin concentration 6 hours after the fifth dose in AMs (37.43 ± 24.61 µg/mL) was significantly greater than that in plasma (1.81 ± 0.21 µg/mL) and ELF (0.82 ± 0.34 µg/mL), resulting in a mean AM concentration-to-plasma concentration ratio of 20.4, a mean AM:ELF ratio of 60.8, and a mean ELF-to-plasma ratio of 0.46. Marbofloxacin was not detected in any samples from control dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Marbofloxacin concentrations in AMs were greater than the mean inhibitory concentrations of major bacterial pathogens in dogs. Results indicated that marbofloxacin accumulates in AMs at concentrations exceeding those reached in plasma and ELF. The accumulation of marbofloxacin in AMs may facilitate treatment for susceptible intracellular pathogens or infections associated with pulmonary macrophage infiltration. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:1770–1774)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate efficacy and safety of using transdermal fentanyl patches (TFP) for analgesia in cats undergoing onychectomy.

Design—Randomized controlled clinical trial.

Animals—45 client-owned cats weighing ≥ 2.7 kg (5.9 lb) undergoing onychectomy, onychectomy and ovariohysterectomy, or onychectomy and castration.

Procedure—Cats were randomly assigned to be treated with a TFP (25 µg/h) or butorphanol; TFP were applied a minimum of 4 hours before surgery (approx 8 hours prior to extubation). Rectal temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, force applied by the forelimbs, and serum fentanyl concentration were measured, and temperament, recovery, degree of sedation, severity of pain, severity of lameness, and appetite were scored before and periodically for up to 40 hours after surgery.

Results—Cats treated with a TFP had better recovery scores at 2 of 4 evaluation times, lower sedation scores at 2 of 8 evaluation times, and lower pain scores at 6 of 8 evaluation times, compared with cats treated with butorphanol. Use of a pressure-sensitive mat to evaluate force applied by the forelimbs did not reveal any differences between groups but did reveal a significant difference between preoperative and postoperative values. Mean ± SD serum fentanyl concentrations were 1.56 ± 1.08, 4.85 ± 2.38, 4.87 ± 1.56, and 4.35 ± 2.97 ng/ml approximately 8, 24, 32, and 48 hours, respectively, after TFP placement.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that use of a TFP (25 µg/h) for postoperative analgesia in cats undergoing onychectomy with or without surgical sterilization is safe and effective. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:1013–1020)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association