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O rofacial tumors are frequent in dogs. The most common malignant types are malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and sarcoma (fibrosarcoma, less frequently osteosarcoma), whereas the most common benign oral tumors are odontogenic tumors

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

decreases recurrence and prolongs remission; however, most cats succumb to recurrent disease despite treatment. 2 , 4 , 5 Feline oral squamous cell carcinomas (FOSCC) account for 60% to 70% of feline malignant oral tumors and are invasive of surrounding

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

papillary exophytic projections of hyperplastic epithelium with hyperkeratosis. H&E stain; bar = 100 µm. D—Photo­micrograph of a section of the large invasive mass reveals a well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with keratin pearl formation (asterisks

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

intolerance, hyporexia, and lethargy. Two years prior, the dog had incomplete excision of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the ungual process of distal phalanx on the fourth digit of the right pelvic limb, and more recently, the dog had splenic torsion

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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curriculum. ERADICATING CANCER. Our equine team is using a new approach to treat melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, sarcoids, and other malignancies in horses. With high-frequency irreversible electroporation, called H-FIRE, we place electrodes directly

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

to gastric neuroendocrine carcinomas, peripheral nerve sheath tumors, lymphoid and myeloid leukemias, squamous cell carcinomas, periocular myxosarcomas, and iridophoromas, with neuroendocrine carcinomas being the most common primary gastric neoplasm

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

restrictive orbital myofibroblastic sarcoma . Vet Pathol . 2011 ; 48 : 742 – 750 . 3. Diehl KA , Pryor SG , Teixeira LBC. Orbital invasive squamous cell carcinoma with adnexal involvement clinically mimicking feline restrictive orbital

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Malignant melanoma is the most common oral tumor in dogs, representing 30% to 40% of all oral tumors, followed by squamous cell carcinoma (17% to 25%) and fibrosarcoma (8% to 25%). 1 It tends to occur in smaller breed dogs; the average age at presentation

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

that could be considered as differential diagnoses, squamous cell carcinomas are usually ulcerated and locally destructive and predilection sites include the periocular region, penis, and perianal region. Melanomas may present as multiple subcutaneous

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

complicated by peritonitis. In the fourth case, facial squamous cell carcinoma with lymphatic metastasis occurred, which caused regional bone lysis in the mandibular, pterygoid, zygomatic, and temporal bones. Although notable inflammation could be attributed

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research