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M usculoskeletal disease is a common cause of poor performance, days lost from training, and retirement from competition in the equine athlete. Orthobiologics, including blood-derived products, such as platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and autologous

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Autologous protein solution (APS) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) are 2 such autologous blood-based therapies for which there is supporting evidence for their role in reducing pain and improving the quality of healing in musculoskeletal disease (osteoarthritis

Open access

(MSCs) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) have gained significant popularity for the treatment of musculoskeletal diseases in horses. 3 These therapies have been hypothesized to provide disease-modifying effects including increasing strength of repair with

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Regenerative medicine represents a broad field of therapies aimed at healing or replacing damaged tissues or organs. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a biological therapy within the regenerative medicine field; it is believed to

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) continues to increase in popularity as a biologic regenerative therapy option and is applied to an ever-expanding array of conditions across numerous species. 1 , 2 PRP originated in human medicine and

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

injury in horses found that intralesional injection of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) resulted in a stronger and more elastic tendon after healing compared to saline (0.9% NaCl) solution–treated controls. In a survey of board-certified specialists (American

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

B iological samples, such as platelet-rich plasma (PRP), are typically frozen at either –80 °C or –20 °C with continuous temperature monitoring of the freezer with alarms in a research setting. 1 , 2 However, in veterinary practice, these samples

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

standard HS-supplemented EGM. Materials and Methods Animals For harvesting of platelet-rich plasma (PRP), 1 L of whole blood was collected from each of 6 healthy university-owned horses (American Quarter Horse [n = 4], and Thoroughbred [n = 2

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

hyaluronic acid, antimicrobials, corticoids, and/or platelet-rich plasma. b There were horses that underwent more than 1 imaging diagnostic technique, resulting in a sum of more than 65 or 100%. MSC therapy was the primary treatment modality for 11

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

oral NSAIDs, corticosteroids, and sodium hyaluronate; and biologics such as platelet-rich plasma, mesenchymal stromal cells, interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist protein, and others. 10 – 17 Most of these treatments decrease pain, but do not

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research