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cattle. The most common techniques implemented to desensitize the paralumbar fossa include proximal/distal paravertebral and inverted L blocks. Distal paravertebral blocks are used frequently due to the technique’s simplicity, ease, and reliability

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

pain and stress, 1 and additional techniques to mitigate pain during and after surgery would be clinically useful. A thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB) consists of injection of a local anesthetic within the so-called thoracic paravertebral space

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

students to perform a paravertebral nerve block. Establishment of the FAVC benefits all KSUCVM students by stimulating new course development, including bull breeding soundness examination (BSE) and advanced palpation courses. During the BSE course

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Author:

nausea and emesis. Surgical techniques The article by Santoro et al, 7 which inspired the cover art by Linden Pederson, describes a technique for performing a thoracic paravertebral block that results in superior nociception and pain control and

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Several techniques for anesthesia of the paralumbar fossa, including proximal paravertebral nerve block, distal paravertebral nerve block, inverted L-block (ILB), and infusion of the incision or line block, can be achieved for

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

operated in left lateral recumbency. The sedated and recumbent cattle were secured in position using a tie-down strap around the thorax and ropes on the legs. Distal paravertebral anesthesia was mainly used until 2001, after which time proximal

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

physical assistance. The dog seemed mildly anxious but showed signs of normal mentation, and findings on cranial nerve examinations were clinically normal. There were moderate signs of pain elicited upon paravertebral palpation at the level of the

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Author:

defects or masses, skin flaps, broken ribs, rib resections, etc. Proposed as a simpler approach to thoracic paravertebral blocks or even epidural anesthesia. Two different infiltrations have been described: the deep infiltration was first described by

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association