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, sepsis, and osteomyelitis. 5 , 10 , 11 Details of the medical management of cold-stunned turtles have been described. 5 , 6 Briefly, turtles are gradually warmed to 24 to 25 °C over several days and treated for dehydration, cardiorespiratory depression

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

complication of dental disease is the formation of odontogenic abscesses and secondary osteomyelitis. 8 , 9 While odontogenic abscesses are common in rabbits, the pathophysiology is not currently well understood. 10 – 12 Although dental disease and

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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helpful for surgical planning in cases with chronic osteomyelitis. 29 18 F-FDG was considered superior to 18 F-NaF for assessment of sepsis associated with femoral prostheses. 30 Back pain has been assessed with 18 F-NaF PET through several studies

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

osteomyelitis (eg, bacterial or fungal) and, less likely because of the young age of the cat, primary or metastatic bone tumors. Figure 2 Same images as in Figure 1 . A focal expansile lesion with permeative lysis (arrowheads) is in the distal metaphysis

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

periosteal proliferation with intraperiosteal and subperiosteal multifocal pyogranulomatous osteomyelitis and Splendore-Hoeppli phenomenon of the mandibles with mild, chronic perivascular to interstitial dermatitis of the overlying skin; reactive

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

’s history and signalment, differential diagnoses included bacterial or fungal osteomyelitis and benign processes such as an aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC). A neoplastic process like osteosarcoma was also proposed given its bimodal age distribution, though the

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

dogs. Two dogs did not have radiographs performed. Twenty-two of 32 dogs had radiographic evidence of osteomyelitis, including periosteal proliferation, osteolysis, implant loosening/failure, and soft tissue swelling, and 10 dogs had no radiographic

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

radiographic images were unremarkable (not shown). Differential diagnoses for the boney changes of the left radius and ulna included a strangulating lesion, incomplete, chronic transverse fracture, or osteomyelitis. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography of the lesion

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

for a healing postoperative TPLO and was suspected secondary to either periostitis associated with the presumed infarct or exuberant callus formation. No cortical or medullary lysis was present to indicate an aggressive lesion. Osteomyelitis was

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A bscesses are common in rabbits and are often associated with dental and otic infections that progress to osteomyelitis. Abscess sites are often infected by multiple species of bacteria and involve mixed aerobic-anaerobic gram-positive and gram

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research