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calves with BRD may help veterinarians when designing antimicrobial treatment protocols for dairy operations. Multiple sampling methods are used to identify the various bacterial respiratory pathogens associated with BRD, with the nasal swab (NS), deep

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

samples (oral swab, nasal swab, and/or serum sample) were collected from each enrolled animal in the services of Community Practice, Oncology, Small Animal Internal Medicine, Blood Bank, Dentistry and Oral Surgery, Clinical Pathology, Dermatology and

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

arrival, total serum protein (TP) concentration was determined with a refractometer, a physical examination was performed by a veterinarian, and a nasal swab was collected and submitted for BC testing using a PCR test (Prairie Diagnostic Services

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

2 nasal swabs at any timepoint postinoculation. 11 Infectious virus was not detected in these swabs, which suggested there was no replication of the virus in these animals. 11 Another study that inoculated 6 calves also detected SARS-CoV-2 RNA in

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

horses is conflicting. The virus could neither be isolated nor detected by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) from nasal swabs, rectal swabs, or various tissues collected from a horse after intranasal infection with SARS-CoV-2. 10 However, SARS-CoV-2 can

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

associated lesions at necropsy can be challenging, particularly for organisms that may also be present as commensals (eg, Pasteurella multocida from a nasal swab). Necropsy isolates provided the highest confidence of an organism’s association with disease

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

addition to the testing performed at National Veterinary Services Laboratories, conventional PCR was performed in-house to generate a sequence that would serve as a template for designing RNA in situ hybridization (ISH) probes. RNA was extracted from nasal

Open access

Species Survival Plan that tested tigers between January 2020 and June 2023. Samples n (%) Feces 20 (91) Nasal swabs 9 (41) Oropharyngeal swabs 4 (18) Blood/serum 4 (18) Tracheal washes 2 (9

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

fluids (4), and nasal swabs (4; Table 2 ; Supplementary Table S1 ). Samples were collected in duplicate for either traditional culture-based testing, including aerobic bacterial culture for all samples and anaerobic culture for 65 cases (83%), or NGS

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

identified on cytological smears from regional LN aspirates (1 mandibular, 1 retropharyngeal). The remaining 3 dogs had cryptococcal organisms identified in a cytocentrifuged specimen of CSF, a smear from a nasal swab, and an aspirate of the right frontal

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research