Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 75 items for :

  • Refine by Access: Open Access articles x
Clear All

this search at each institution included any of the following: aneurysm, cardiac, vascular, cardiomegaly, arrhythmia, murmur, exophthalmia, atherosclerosis, arteriosclerosis, cardiomyopathy, effusion, pleural, pericardial, coelomic effusion, heart

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

review of the images or imaging reports, the dog was excluded from the study. Data collected included severity of any abdominal effusion; diameter and number of splenic masses; severity of any splenic mass inhomogeneity; presence of 0, 1, or ≥ 2 liver

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To provide a video tutorial detailing how to perform “blind” and ultrasound-guided abdominocentesis for diagnostic and therapeutic guidance, and to provide a brief demonstration of intra-abdominal pressure measurement (IAP).

ANIMALS

Any cat or dog with suspicion of free abdominal effusion or patients requiring measurement of IAP.

METHODS

Abdominocentesis should be performed when there is high suspicion for peritoneal effusion based on physical exam and/or diagnostic imaging. The 4-quadrant tap uses 20-gauge or larger needles placed blindly in ≥ 1 of the 4 quadrants of the abdomen to collect abdominal fluid. In contrast, ultrasound allows visualization of fluid in the abdomen prior to percutaneous insertion of a needle and syringe to collect fluid. Regardless of collection technique, fluid should have immediate cytologic analysis and later can be submitted for biochemical parameters, additional cellular analysis by a pathologist, and culture and sensitivity (in rare cases if indicated). Intravesicular bladder pressure measurement using a manometer–urinary catheter system approximates the IAP when there is concern for organ hypoperfusion and compartment syndrome.

RESULTS

Abdominocentesis can be performed with and without the use of ultrasound guidance. Intravesicular bladder pressure measurement is used to diagnose and trend IAP values before and after treatments are performed.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Abdominocentesis is a simple and safe technique that all small animal clinicians should be comfortable performing. Effusion sampling can guide further diagnostics and treatments. Measurement of IAP is simple and requires no specialized equipment.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. The dog had been previously evaluated because of severe abdominal effusion 1 year earlier, at which time 4 L of abdominal fluid was removed. Clinical and Clinicopathologic Findings On physical examination, the dog was estimated to be 5

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

effusion (not shown). Thoracic and abdominal radiography revealed a markedly enlarged globoid cardiac silhouette and moderate loss of serosal detail (not shown). No peritoneopericardial mesothelial remnant was identified. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A 9.5-year-old 37.8-kg sexually intact male Briard was referred to the Purdue University Small Animal Veterinary Teaching Hospital because of pleural effusion, suspected cardiomyopathy, and a 1-month history of coughing, exercise

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A 4-year-old 4.52-kg spayed female domestic shorthair cat was presented to the Louisiana State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital for evaluation of lethargy, abdominal effusion, and an abdominal mass. The cat was presented to her

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

thoracic and abdominal ultrasonographic evaluation revealed a mass that appeared to be associated with the right heart and mild to moderate hypoechoic abdominal effusion. No abdominal masses were noted. Blood pressure was undetectable with a Doppler

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

mediastinal mass (eg, lymphoma, thymoma, ectopic thyroid carcinoma), effusion (pleural or mediastinal and causing subsequent lateral lung lobe retraction), metastatic mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and nonneoplastic etiologies, such as reactive lymphadenopathy

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

diagnosis considered for the dog’s abdominal effusion was cardiovascular disease or portal hypertension. Radiographic images ( Figure 1 ) provided by the referring veterinarian were reviewed. Figure 1 Right lateral (A) and ventrodorsal (B) thoracic

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association