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Inhalation of basidiospores or desiccated yeast cells from the environment allows colonization of the nasal cavity and subsequent mucosal invasion; this is why the nasal passages and sinuses are thought to be the primary site of cryptococcal infection in most

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Introduction Feline idiopathic chronic rhinosinusitis (FICR) is an important cause of nasal discharge in cats, second only to neoplasia. 1 The disease is progressive, with a variable age of onset. 1 Clinical signs often last more than 4

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

was similar other than bloody discharge associated with the interocular swelling. The CT scan revealed a rim-enhancing nasal mass causing bilateral destruction of the nasal turbinates ( Figure 1 ) . The mass extended through areas of bony lysis with

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Chronic nasal discharge in cats is a frustrating challenge to owners and veterinarians alike. Often, acute nasal discharge in cats is self-limiting or responds to empiric treatments. However, discharge may persist in some cats for months or years

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Enzootic nasal tumor, formerly known as infectious adenopapilloma or infectious nasal adenocarcinoma, is a virus-induced tumor of nasal cavities in small ruminants. The causative agent of ENT is ENTV, a chimeric group B/D retrovirus; ENTV is

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Aspergillus spp are saprophytic fungi that are ubiquitous in the environment. Various species of Aspergillus can cause disease in the nasal cavity and sinuses or, less commonly, are associated with invasive systemic infection of other organs

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A 4-year-old 14.5-kg (31.9-lb) spayed female French Bulldog was referred to the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine Veterinary Teaching Hospital for treatment of a suspected right-sided nasal angiofibroma associated with a 4-month

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A 13-year-old spayed female Siamese cat was evaluated for bilateral nasal discharge and dyspnea of 4 days' duration. The clinical signs had progressed despite treatment with amoxicillin-clavulanate (16 mg/kg [7.3 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h). The cat had a

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Eighty percent of nasal tumors in dogs are malignant, and 60% to 75% are of epithelial origin. 1–4 Primary tumors of the nasal cavity account for approximately 1% of all neoplasms that develop in dogs. 1–5 Despite the low incidence detected in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Five dogs that ranged in age from 4 to 10 years (median age, 9 years) and weighed between 8.5 and 51.0 kg (18.7 and 112.2 lb) with undefined nasal masses were evaluated between 2012 and 2014 at the veterinary teaching hospital of Texas A

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association