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Problem A 14-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat was examined for gradual weight loss. The owners reported recent increases in water consumption and frequency of urination, which was indicated by the litter pan requiring more

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Problem A 5-year-old spayed female German Shorthair Pointer weighing 20.2 kg (44.4 lb) was referred for evaluation of a 6-month history of weight loss and polyphagia. Initially, clinical signs included infrequent vomiting and diarrhea of large

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

down into a stream while hunting. Physical and orthopedic examinations revealed the dog was in good body condition (score of 5 on a 9-point scale) and had moderate weight-bearing lameness (grade of 3 on a 5-point scale) and asymmetric forelimb muscle

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

weight on all 4 limbs for a short period. It was transferred to the orthopedic ward for continued monitoring. Six days after surgery, the dog was able to ambulate on its own with no support but was slightly ataxic. It was discharged from the hospital 10

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

find an effect of oral glucosamine-chondroitin administration would support giving greater weight to those results than to the limited positive results of the other trial. 5 Both clinical trials revealed significant benefit from NSAID treatment, and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

variable results, with load bearing in THA limbs greater, equivalent to, or less than that in the contralateral unaffected limbs in various animals. Weight bearing was equivalent or greater in FHNE-treated limbs versus THA-treated limbs in dogs with both

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

clinical signs of hepatic encephalopathy. The dose was subject to adjustment depending on weight gain, serum ammonia concentration, and fecal consistency. The decision to use lactulose was made on the basis of human and veterinary literature reviews 1

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

communication with the owner. For surgery, the dog was positioned in sternal recumbency, with the vertebral column and pelvis secured in a weight-bearing position with the aid of vacuum-activated surgical positioning bags. A dorsal approach over the sixth

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association