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selected a control group of nonbrachycephalic dogs with no clinical or CT findings of upper or lower respiratory tract disease that weighed between 5 and 27 kg (ie, similar to the typical weight of brachycephalic breeds chosen for the study). Data

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

amputations with short-term follow-up available. Medical records review Variables extracted from patient records included species, date of birth, age at date of first and second amputation, breed, sex, weight at date of first and second amputation, and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

weight ranging from 3 to 10 g. Goldfish were of unknown sex and age. Fish were kept in 32-L rectangular aquarium tanks. Water was dechlorinated as directed by the manufacturer (Prime), salt was added at a concentration of 2 g/L as in a previous study 10

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

fashion, as described above. Information retrieved from medical records consisted of dog sex and breed; age, reproductive status, body weight (BW), and body condition score (BCS; assessed on a scale of 1 to 9 and in tertiles, as follows: 1 to 4, 5, and 6

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

deceased dog in the same household that substantiated aflatoxicosis. 33 Medical records review —Recorded information included signalment (age, sex, body weight, and breed), clinical signs and physical examination findings, routine clinicopathologic tests

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Palpate abdomen for organomegaly 24 100 * 2 Body weight 24 100 * 2 Body condition score 25 100 2 Mucous membrane color 24 100 * 2 Capillary refill time 25 100 2 General assessment 24 96 2

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

in the reduction of clinical signs associated with canine atopic dermatitis. Efficacy was demonst ated in dogs that were diagnosed with atopic dermatitis and that received a single weight-dependent dose of vaccine. A reduction in clinical signs was

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Intermittent positive-pressure ventilation (ppv) is an invasive means of respiratory support that is indicated in animals with central and peripheral neuromuscular disease, as well as in those with primary disorders of the lung parenchyma. We reviewed the medical records of 34 dogs and 7 cats treated with ppv. The animals could be allotted to 2 groups; group 1 (21/41) had primary failure of ventilation attributable to neuromuscular disease or airway obstruction, and group 2 (20/41) had primary pulmonary parenchymal disease.

Mean inspiratory time was 1.02 ± 0.2 seconds (range, 0.6 to 1.5 seconds). Mean inspiratory flow was 26.9 ± 18.5 L/min (range, 7 to 87 L/min), and was positively correlated with body weight (R = 0.57). Mean set respiratory rate was 19.6 ± 10 breaths/min (range, 5 to 60 breaths/min), with mean tidal volume of 15.5 ± 6.2 ml/kg of body weight. Positive end-expiratory pressure (peep) was required in 14 of 20 dogs in group 2. Mean peak airway pressure in group 1 was 21.6 ± 6.3 cm of H2O, whereas in group 2 it was 32.9 ± 12.5 cm of H2O. The higher peak airway pressure in group-2 dogs reflected poor lung compliance and the use of peep in dogs with parenchymal lung disease. Mean duration of ppv was 28.2 ± 29.4 hours (range, 2 to 137 hours).

The overall survival rate was 39% (16/41). Factors that appeared to correlate with survival included age, with higher mortality in animals < 1 year old or > 11 years old (P < 0.01); body weight, with mortality highest in animals < 10 kg (P < 0.05); reason for ventilation, with survival in group 1 being 57%, and in group 2, 20%; and development of complications, with 28% of animals that developed major complications surviving, compared with 48% of those that did not develop major complications. Two major complications of ppv were documented: pneumothorax and pneumonia. Twelve of 41 animals developed pneumothorax and had been ventilated by use of peak airway pressures > 25 cm of H2O, or peep. An additional 6 animals developed subclinical pneumonia during treatment with ppv.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

The case records of 17 horses with atrophy of the right hepatic lobe were reviewed. Fifteen horses had signs of colic. Two horses had clinical problems that were unassociated with gastrointestinal tract disease. Ages ranged from 5 to 30 years (mean, 12.6 years) and there was no breed or sex predisposition.

In clinically normal horses, the right hepatic lobe constitutes half of the total liver weight. The right hepatic lobe in the 17 horses in this study ranged from 11.0 to 38.3% of the total liver weight (mean, 27.8%). Findings on histologic examination of hepatic tissue from horses in the study were variable. Most had loss of hepatocytes, with condensation of hepatic stroma and thick wrinkled hepatic capsules.

Additional findings in the horses included torsion of the large colon (15), ileus without gastric rupture (3), typhlocolitis (2), colon infarction secondary to mesenteric strangulation (1), colon infarction secondary to sepsis (1), strangulation of the small intestine from pendulous lipoma (1), and nephrosplenic entrapment (1).

No morphologic evidence of angiopathic disease involving the arterial or venous blood supply to the right hepatic lobe was found. Additionally, there was no evidence of biliary tract disease in this portion of the liver. Right hepatic lobe atrophy is believed to result from long-term, insidious, compression of this portion of the liver from abnormal distention of the right dorsal colon and base of the cecum. The practice of feeding horses high-concentrate, low-fiber diets may contribute to atony of the right dorsal colon, with resultant distention that compresses the right hepatic lobe against the rigid, visceral surface of the diaphragm.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate anatomic reduction and surgical stabilization of femoral capital physeal fractures in cats.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—13 cats.

Procedure—Medical records of cats with unilateral or bilateral femoral capital physeal fractures evaluated from 1998 to 2002 were reviewed. Age and weight of cats at the time of surgery; breed; sex; concurrent injuries; severity of lameness before and 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after surgery; the amount of fracture reduction achieved and number of Kirschner wires (K-wires) used; degree of degenerative joint disease of the hip joint and lysis of the femoral neck and head observed after surgery; whether K-wires were removed after surgery; and complications after surgery were evaluated.

Results—Thirteen cats with 16 capital physeal fractures were identified. There was significant improvement in the severity of clinical lameness in all cats from weeks 1 through 4 after surgery. There was no correlation between the scores of the individuals who evaluated radiographs for fracture reduction and placement of K-wires.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that surgical stabilization and repair of femoral capital physeal fractures facilitate a short recovery period and a good prognosis for return to normal function in cats. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:1478–1482)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association