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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To identify and evaluate 3 types of angiographic catheters for retrograde urinary bladder catheterization in healthy male goats.

ANIMALS 12 sexually intact yearling Alpine-cross bucks.

PROCEDURES Three 5F angiographic catheters of the same length (100 cm) and diameter (0.17 cm) but differing in curvature at the tip were labeled A (straight tip), B (tip bent in 1 place), and C (tip bent in 2 places). During a single anesthetic episode, attempts were made to blindly pass each catheter into the urinary bladder of each goat. Order of catheters used was randomized, and the veterinarian passing the catheter was blinded as to catheter identity. The total number of attempts at catheter passage and the total number of successful attempts were recorded.

RESULTS Catheter A was unsuccessfully passed in all 12 goats, catheter B was successfully passed in 8 goats, and catheter C was successfully passed in 4 goats. The success rate for catheter B was significantly greater than that for catheter A; however, no significant difference was identified between catheters B and C or catheters A and C.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE 2 angiographic catheters were identified that could be successfully, blindly advanced in a retrograde direction into the urinary bladder of healthy sexually intact male goats. Such catheters may be useful for determining urethral patency, emptying the urinary bladder, and instilling chemolysing agents in goats with clinical obstructive urolithiasis.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

management is required, which avoids the invasive and time-consuming procedure of intermittent catheterization. 17 Intermittent catheterization has been used in our veterinary clinic by appropriately trained veterinarians and veterinary nurses. The bladder

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

accepted that a urine dipstick test can yield false-negative results, possibly leading to diagnostic errors and, in turn, to incorrect therapeutic decisions in some dogs, many veterinarians prefer to directly determine the UPC ratio in all patients. This

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

the novel 2-catheter technique. Both veterinarians who were unfamiliar with the novel 2-catheter technique were allowed a single trial run performed on 1 animal, during which CP 2 and CP 3 each executed the verbal instructions provided by CP 1 and

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

3 CKD and osteoarthritis were enrolled in a prospective clinical trial at the Kansas State University Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital. Patients were recruited from referring veterinarians as well as from dogs examined at the Kansas State

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

collection and analysis —From each dog, a 2.5-mL urine sample was obtained by cystocentesis that was performed by a veterinarian or veterinary technician. An optical refractometer a that was calibrated in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions prior

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-4295(94)80023-5 10. Hudson LC Hamilton WP . Atlas of feline anatomy for veterinarians . Philadelphia : Saunders , 1993 ; 171 . 11. Doust RT Clarke SP Hammond G , et al. Circumcaval ureter associated with an intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in a dog

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

subclinical renal disease is a challenge for veterinarians. In addition, alterations in renal function are directly or indirectly related to many research applications, and changes in BUN and serum creatinine concentrations may not reflect these alterations

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

. Dogs were observed at least twice daily by a veterinarian (KKS or SAB) or a veterinary technician (DLS) to detect clinical abnormalities. Daily food intake was measured as the difference between the weight of the amount of food provided at feeding time

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

been established in dogs or people, evaluation of UTI recurrence in dogs receiving an oral supplement of chondroitin sulfate is necessary before this practice can be recommended by veterinarians to pet owners. Limitations of the present study were

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research