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Introduction Veterinarian-client communication skills are essential to primary care veterinary practice. 1 , 2 The quality of veterinarian-client communication has been associated with client satisfaction, 3 client adherence to a

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Veterinarians work in environments with numerous occupational hazards. 1 – 3 Veterinarians are routinely exposed to anesthetic gases, zoonotic diseases, radiation, and work-related mental stress. 1 – 4 Previous studies have

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of full-time–equivalent (FTE) veterinarians per practice grew from 2.1 in 1999 to 2.4 in 2009 4 and 2.5 in 2018. 5 Furthermore, the percentage of veterinary establishments with > 20 employees more than doubled between 2010 and 2016. 5 Although an

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

prescription and administration are among the most common interventions for clinical veterinarians. In small animal first-opinion practices, veterinarians prescribe or administer medications in 83% (40/48) of their consultations. 5 However, veterinarians may

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

animals. Cost, accessibility to clinics, cultural/language barriers, a lack of pet owner education and poor veterinarian-client relationships have been identified as the most common barriers to veterinary care. 9 These barriers disproportionality affect

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

an integral part of veterinarian-client-patient interactions. 1 Yet, in a study involving 1,400 pet owners in the US, > 1 in 10 of the respondents said their pet received a physical exam during a veterinary visit even though, as the authors stated

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. These findings may help veterinarians more accurately differentiate between expected drug effects and spontaneous cardiac disease in cats receiving DXM. Supplementary Materials Supplementary materials are posted online at the journal website

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To characterize diagnostic results, treatment, and outcome of dogs with blastomycosis during a 15-year period in Louisiana.

Design

Retrospective case series.

Animals

115 dogs with blastomycosis.

Procedure

Medical records were reviewed for dogs with blastomycosis examined between 1980 and 1995. Additional data were collected from the state veterinary diagnostic laboratory, via telephone interviews of owners, and by use of a random survey of the hospital population.

Results

Blastomycosis was detected mainly in young, large-breed dogs. Proximity to a body of water was a significant risk factor for affected dogs. Most dogs were affected in January and August through October. Clinical signs and results of physical examination reflected the multisystemic nature of the disease. Commonly affected systems included the respiratory tract and lymphatic, ocular, and cutaneous systems. Nodular interstitial and interstitial patterns were common findings on thoracic radiographs. Cytologic examination was successful in identifying organisms in samples from vitreous, skin, and lymph nodes. Similar results were achieved for dogs treated with a combination of amphotericin B and ketoconazole, compared with dogs treated with itraconazole.

Clinical Implications

Results of this study should assist veterinarians with the recognition and management of blastomycosis in dogs. Blastomycosis should be considered as a differential diagnosis for large-breed dogs that live close to a body of water in areas in which the disease is endemic or in dogs with a history of being transported to endemic areas that subsequently develop signs of pulmonary, ocular, lymphatic, or cutaneous disease. Treatment with itraconazole was as effective as treatment with a combination of amphotericin B and ketoconazole. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;213:658-664)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Specialty training is a pivotal time for veterinarians, during which professional identities formed during 4 years of veterinary school are often deeply challenged. 1 Professional identity formation (PIF) for veterinary students

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

rates are very low. Thus, veterinarians infrequently see pets affected by tick bites or tick-borne disease. 8 Nonetheless, veterinary clinics can be an integral part of tick surveillance programs, particularly in areas with a low prevalence of human

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association