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SUMMARY

Mass screening elisa methods were developed for testing cattle serum for antibodies against 14 common livestock diseases simultaneously. The absorbance values were transformed to a %elisa (spectrophotometric antibody end point) by a computer interfaced with a microplate reader. A histogram indicating a cutoff point and a report for the veterinarian also was generated. The computer program produced a print-out of the antibody profile for each animal tested, the antibody concentration against each disease, and a histogram (antibody profile) showing the prevalence of each disease in the herd. Serum samples were obtained from 1,953 cattle, including 880 dairy cattle from 10 herds and 1,073 beef cattle from 20 herds. These samples were obtained from June 1988 through June 1989. The highest antibody prevalence was against bluetongue virus. Of the 1,953 cattle tested, 1,223 (63%) were seropositive for bluetongue virus, including 502 (57%) of the dairy cattle and 721 (67%) beef cattle. Other antibody prevalences, in descending order, were: rotavirus (44%), Pasteurella spp (25%), Leptospira spp and Haemophilus spp (22%), Mycoplasma spp (18%), parainfluenza virus (17%), Campylobacter spp (16%), Anaplasma marginale (15%), bovine leukosis virus (13%), Brucella spp (8%), Mycobacterium paratuberculosis (8%), bovine viral diarrhea virus (3%), and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (3%). Major differences in antibody prevalence between dairy and beef cattle were that only 4% of the dairy cattle were seropositive for A marginale, compared with 25% of the beef cattle, and conversely, 29% of the dairy cattle were seropositive for bovine leukosis virus, compared with 1% of the beef cattle. Further development of the elisa is advocated for mass screening of livestock sera for the application in epidemiologic methods for disease control in food animals.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

clinics that were confirmed by diagnostic laboratories or participating veterinarians as infected with C felis on the basis of results of blood smear analysis. Practitioners at veterinary clinics in Georgia and Arkansas were contacted via telephone, e

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

agglutination test, and had positive results for a direct Coombs' test or moderate to marked spherocytosis on a peripheral blood smear. 28 Thirty-nine dogs were suspected clinically of having IMHA by the attending veterinarian. Serum samples from these dogs

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

of Reptile and Amphibian Veterinarians revealed that veterinarians may not provide appropriate or effective analgesia for reptile patients undergoing noxious procedures. 1 However, an investigation 2 of the pharmacodynamic properties of NSAIDs, such

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

challenge test. They were housed separately the first week of the washout period, and then all dogs of the same group were housed together during the second week of the washout period. Dogs were monitored by a veterinarian the day before starting the oral

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

between the observation of the first signs of GIT disease and blood sample collection could not be standardized and was quite variable. Owners and referring veterinarians made the decision of when these horses would be admitted to the referral hospital

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

hypersensitivity reactions. The health conditions of dogs were monitored by a veterinarian throughout all the experimental procedures. Dogs were fed commercial dry food without soy protein b twice a day, whereas water was available ad libitum. Guaranteed

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

in all cattle were recorded by a veterinarian who was unaware of treatment group allocations and nasal secretions were collected daily. Body weight was recorded immediately prior to challenge and at 14 days after challenge. Blood samples for SVN

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

retired racing Greyhounds (7 males and 5 females; age range, 17 months to 3 years) that had been donated to the university. The dogs were determined to be healthy on the basis of a physical examination performed by a staff veterinarian and results of a CBC

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

be injured or moribund were evaluated by a veterinarian and treated accordingly. Because some of the calves had signs of coccidiosis, all calves received a 5-day treatment course of amprolium on days 13 through 17. Briefly, the automatic waterer was

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research