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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

suggested that private practitioners who were aware of and cared for the HAB in their practices were more successful than were those who did not. Lewis and Klausner, 5 using focus groups of veterinarians, identified 13 nontechnical competencies that would

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

household income, the age of their cat, how they had heard about the clinic, the number of times the cat had been examined by a veterinarian prior to the clinic, and why the cat had not been spayed or neutered prior to the clinic. The second part of the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

To date, urban planners have had only a marginal interest in urban pet management. However, they have a potential role to play through application of urban design principles that may improve the quality of pets’ lives and reduce problems. The design principles appropriate to pets have been recently identified. These principles are part of a worldwide movement to improve housing design, with guidelines for various considerations that have been misunderstood or ignored in the past. Veterinarians have a role to play in alerting their clients to the need to consider the quality of their pets’ environment and in acting as advocates in relation to urban animal management and regulation.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Cancer in cats is being diagnosed with increasing frequency. Euthanasia or an active intervention such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or surgery are treatment choices for the owner at diagnosis of the cat's disease. In this study, 2 interviews with cat owners, one soon after diagnosis of cancer in the cat and one 6 months later, were used to identify owner characteristics associated with a decision of euthanasia or intervention, to identify factors associated with an owner's satisfaction with euthanasia or intervention, and to evaluate inappropriate expectations of the owners who selected an intervention. The study included 89 owners from 3 referral hospitals. In logistic regression analysis, significant factors were not found that affected the owner's decision to euthanatize the cat versus intervene. Satisfaction with the decision to euthanatize the cat was associated with the ability of the cat to groom itself, eat, and play at the first interview. Among owners who selected an intervention, 4 combinations of factors were associated with being satisfied. The first combination was clinic of origin (CLIN), having a live cat at the 6-month follow-up interview (LIVE), and understanding the number of return visits required for the intervention. The second was CLIN, LIVE, and type and frequency of adverse effects from the intervention at the 6-month interview. The third was CLIN, LIVE, and feeling guilty at the 6-month interview. The fourth was CLIN, LIVE, and whether the cat had a good or excellent quality of life at the first interview. Thirty percent (21/69) of the owners tended to overestimate their cats’ life expectancy. Owners also felt they had reasonably accurate estimations of adverse effects of treatment and number of return visits, but underestimated the costs required for an intervention.

For owners who elect an intervention, a reminder from the veterinarian that emotional upheavals may develop even after the decision has been made is important. To provide optimal patient care and client education, veterinarians must find a middle ground between being knowledgeable, practical, and informed, and being compassionate and approachable.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To assess veterinary students' perceptions regarding the importance of addressing the human-animal bond in veterinary practice and their perceptions about the adequacy of curricula on the human-animal bond as presented in US veterinary colleges.

Design

Survey.

Procedure

Data were collected via a brief questionnaire mailed during the summer of 1996. Questionnaires were returned by 552 senior veterinary students representing 21 of 27 veterinary colleges in the United States.

Results

Senior veterinary students believed that the human-animal bond should be a concern of practicing veterinarians, but most did not believe they were receiving adequate instruction about the human-animal bond in their veterinary colleges. Gender was significantly related to differences in perceptions; female students appeared to have more interest in addressing the human-animal bond than male students. Students in small animal programs viewed the human-animal bond differently than those in large animal programs. Finally, students attending schools with extensive human-animal bond or human relations curricula were more likely to believe they were receiving adequate instruction in this area than students in other schools.

Conclusions and Clinical Implications

Curricula addressing the human-animal bond need to be developed and implemented in veterinary colleges in the United States. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;215:1428–1432)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Owners may ask for assistance in identifying the breed of newly acquired dogs, and veterinarians frequently use information regarding dog breed to assess the risk that dogs will develop various breed-specific medical problems. However, the utility of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

To meet the needs of their clients and patients, veterinarians must be able to communicate effectively, understand the relationships their clients have with their pets, and appreciate how their clients' cultural beliefs and values impact that

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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, nurses, and mental health professionals are joining veterinarians, nurse-technicians, and veterinary students to provide one-health services to these populations. 6 In particular, based on the author’s observations, veterinary students are passionate

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association