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overt, subclinical, or delayed. Because veterinarians may find themselves responding to emergency incidents, they should be aware of the agents that may cause mass casualties. Importantly, if such agents have been used intentionally, then the incident is

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Veterinarians who may respond to emergency incidents should be aware that traditional first responders (eg, firefighting, emergency medical, and law enforcement personnel) typically establish control zones around contaminated or otherwise

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

worldwide has increased on unprecedented scales, both in the number and size of incidents. With wildfire activity in western North America at historical highs in 2020 and showing no signs of improvement, it is increasingly important that veterinarians are

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate early medical and behavioral effects of deployment to the World Trade Center, Fresh Kills Landfill, or the Pentagon on responding search-and-rescue (SAR) dogs.

Design—Prospective double cohort study.

Animals—The first cohort included SAR dogs responding to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks (deployed), and the second cohort included SAR dogs trained in a similar manner but not deployed (controls). Enrollment occurred from October 2001 to June 2002.

Procedure—Dogs were examined by their local veterinarians; thoracic radiographs and blood samples were shipped to the University of Pennsylvania for analysis. Handlers completed medical and training histories and a canine behavioral survey.

Results—Deployed dogs were older and had more search experience than control dogs. Serum concentrations of globulin and bilirubin and activity of alkaline phosphatase were significantly higher in deployed dogs, independent of age and training. Despite significant differences in several blood parameters, values for both groups were within reference ranges. No pulmonary abnormalities were detected on radiographs, and no significant differences in behavior or medical history were detected between groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Within the first year following the September 11 attacks, there was no evidence that responding dogs developed adverse effects related to their work. Mild but significantly higher serum concentrations of globulin and bilirubin and activity of alkaline phosphatase in deployed dogs suggested higher antigen or toxin exposure. These dogs will be monitored for delayed effects for at least 3 years. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:861–867)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Ever since 1907, private veterinary practitioners have been recognized by the USDA as having a role in assisting federal veterinarians in the control of animal diseases. 1 Today, the National Veterinary Accreditation Program provides a method for

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

the spread of disease. Controlling the spread of strictly animal diseases obviously falls within the purview of veterinary medicine, but veterinarians also play a role in public health by way of zoonotic diseases and other human-animal interactions

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

response activities and was largely made up of veterinarians and volunteers from the LVMA and the LSU SVM, which is an active district organization member of the LVMA. The following is a report of the emergency response to equine disaster victims by faculty

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association