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Statement of the Problem A dog was evaluated for growling at, snapping at, and biting its owner, groomer, and veterinarian. Signalment The patient was a 3.5-year-old 22-kg (48.4-lb) spayed female English Springer Spaniel. History

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

town. The caregiver reported that the dog appeared to have been bitten on the tail by an unseen insect, causing the dog to suddenly start chewing its tail. The primary care veterinarian had recommended via telephone that the caregiver wash the dog

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, it scratched veterinary staff for the first time. This behavior problem gradually worsened. Four weeks before the time of the behavioral consultation, the cat's aggression prevented its primary care veterinarian from performing a physical examination

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

the house. The dog was evaluated by the referring veterinarian, and clomipramine hydrochloride a (2.2 mg/kg [1.0 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h) was prescribed. The owner was also instructed to administer alprazolam (0.056 mg/kg [0.025 mg/lb], PO) and give the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

referring veterinarian prescribed trazodone (50 mg [7.1 mg/kg], PO, q 12 h) for the tail-chasing behavior and carprofen (18.7 mg [2.6 mg/kg], PO, q 12 h) for pain management. After discharge, the surgical site had healed well, but the tail-chasing behavior

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

handled by their owners or the veterinarian. All forms of aggression described by the owners of these 2 cats met well-established criteria for diagnostic categories in behavioral medicine, and episodes of aggression could be clearly linked to environmental

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

veterinarian prior to referral. Signalment The patient was a 4.5-year-old spayed female domestic shorthair cat. History The cat had been acquired at 8 weeks of age from an animal shelter. History prior to adoption was unremarkable. The cat lived

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Small amounts of urine were found in 5 to 10 locations daily on vertical surfaces in the room. Approximately 1.5 months after adopting the patient, the owner returned with the patient to the referring veterinarian's office with the complaint of urine

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

3 years of these behaviors, the owners sought veterinary advice. The primary care veterinarian had prescribed fluoxetine hydrochloride (2 mg/kg [0.91 mg/lb]). There were only a few incidents of local gunfire after the dog had been receiving

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, the dog was evaluated by the primary care veterinarian because of the described behaviors. At that time, the referring veterinarian suspected hyperactivity or obsessive-compulsive disorder, and amitriptyline hydrochloride (1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb], PO, q

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association