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system 7 with results of subjective lameness examinations performed by 3 experienced equine veterinarians for evaluation of lameness in horses. We hypothesized that data obtained by use of an inertial sensor system would be correlated with results of

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of indwelling nasogastric intubation on the gastric emptying rate of liquid in horses.

Animals—6 healthy horses.

Procedures—Horses were assigned to treatment and control groups in a prospective randomized crossover study with a washout period of at least 4 weeks between trials. Acetaminophen (20 mg/kg) diluted in 1 L of distilled water was administered via nasogastric tube at time points of 0, 12, 30, 48, and 72 hours to evaluate the liquid-phase gastric emptying rate. In control horses, nasogastric tubes were removed after administration of acetaminophen. In horses receiving treatment, the tube was left indwelling and maintained for 72 hours. A 10-mL sample of blood was collected from a jugular vein immediately before and 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120, and 180 minutes after acetaminophen administration. Serum acetaminophen concentrations were measured by use of a colorimetric method.

Results—Peak serum acetaminophen concentration was significantly higher in the control group (38.11 μg/mL) than in the treatment group (29.09 μg/mL), and the time required to reach peak serum acetaminophen concentration was significantly shorter in the control group (22.79 minutes) than in the treatment group (35.95 minutes).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that indwelling nasogastric intubation has a delaying effect on the gastric emptying rate of liquids. Veterinarians should consider the potential for delayed gastric emptying when placing and maintaining an indwelling nasogastric tube for an extended period of time after surgery. Repeated nasogastric intubation may be better than maintenance of an indwelling tube in horses with ileus.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

summaries. 15,16 The design of those studies 15,16 was similar to that used in the present study. Both veterinarians and owners evaluated dogs before and after 14 days of treatment. In a multisite, randomized, placebo-controlled, blinded study 15 of 227

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

commonly associated with general anesthesia. 5,6 A 2000 study 7 that involved a survey of veterinarians in private practice revealed that only a small number had the ability to monitor blood pressure during general anesthesia, and a 2008 study 8 in the

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

rabbits had a body condition score between 3.5 and 6.0 (scale of 1 to 9), as determined during examination by an attending veterinarian. Rabbits included in the study were client-owned animals undergoing CT examination for diagnosis of disease processes

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

veterinarians to better monitor group health, identify specific dolphins for endoscopic evaluation, and determine the efficacy of treatment regimens. Sucrose concentrations in serum or urine are typically measured by use of electrochemical HPLC analysis. 14

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

veterinarians at this time. A technique that has potential for development into an objective method of lameness evaluation for use in the field is wireless transmission of data from inertial sensors attached to the horse's body. Sensors can be designed that

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

associated with delayed treatment and sheep loss. Sheep producers and veterinarians typically use urine ketone test strips to evaluate ketone status in late-gestation ewes. The urine ketone strips can be used to semiquantitatively measure the amount of

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Each day, 2 chickens were arbitrarily selected by the client and were transported in a standard pet carrier to the Boren Veterinary Medical Hospital at Oklahoma State University. Physical examination of both chickens was performed by 1 veterinarian (JB

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

know when to allow the dog to rest to optimize safety and performance. One strategy that can be readily performed in a field setting is monitoring the hydration status of a dog. Veterinarians can teach handlers to recognize life-threatening illnesses

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research