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graduate's opportunity to gain licensure as a veterinary medical practitioner and because the NAVLE is the only currently available standardized measure of clinical ability used by all veterinary colleges in the United States and Canada. Measures of student

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Colleges of veterinary medicine have an obligation to provide veterinary students a curriculum that includes training in a variety of technical and nontechnical (eg, business and communication) skills. Balancing these requirements is challenging

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

retirement age. 13 However, most commonly, students enter veterinary school with the desire and expectation to practice companion animal medicine 12,17 rather than pursue a career in veterinary public health. The changing demographics of the population of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

For schools of veterinary medicine, helping veterinary students successfully attain careers in fields other than clinical practice can be quite challenging, partly because students are often uninformed about the full range of career options

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

clinical experiences administered throughout the preclinical years. The belief that students will be able to draw on the biomedical science information taught during these preclinical years when they are presented with clinical problems constitutes a major

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

More than 15 years ago, Kogan and McConnell 1 suggested that veterinary students, like medical students, should be provided psychological services, primarily because the level of stress and the workload associated with the veterinary curriculum

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objectives—To determine perceptions of veterinary technical and professional skills among veterinary students and recent graduates.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Sample Population—281 students and 142 recent graduates from the Ontario Veterinary College.

Procedure—A survey was designed and administered to first- through fourth-year students and veterinarians who had graduated either 1 or 6 years before survey administration.

Results—Overall response rate was 70%. Learning about technical and professional skills was highly valued. Most participants felt they had not received instruction about professional skills, but those who had felt more competent about them. Perceptions of competence increased slightly with increased comfort discussing emotional veterinary issues with instructors. Neither gender nor increased age was related to increased feelings of competence. Almost all fourth-year students felt competent and comfortable about examining an animal with the client present, assessing suffering, diagnosing parvovirus infection, performing surgery, and working as group members. However, many did not feel competent or comfortable about delivering bad news, setting time limits yet providing quality service, helping clients with limited funds make treatment decisions, dealing with demanding people, and euthanasia. Feelings of competence and comfort were closely related but were not identical.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In the interests of best preparing entry-level veterinarians, technical and professional skills need to be emphasized in a learning environment where students feel comfortable discussing emotional veterinary issues. A professional skills curriculum addressing underlying selfawareness, communication, and interpersonal issues, as well as procedural matters, would likely increase the proportion of fourth-year students who feel competent and comfortable about professional skills by the end of their undergraduate training. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:924–931)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

allotted to larger numbers of students. In 2009, the WSU CVM restructured its surgical skills curriculum, moving the introductory surgery course (which consisted of a combination of lectures and laboratory sessions) from the second semester of the second

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association