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Objective

To assess veterinary students' perceptions regarding the importance of addressing the human-animal bond in veterinary practice and their perceptions about the adequacy of curricula on the human-animal bond as presented in US veterinary colleges.

Design

Survey.

Procedure

Data were collected via a brief questionnaire mailed during the summer of 1996. Questionnaires were returned by 552 senior veterinary students representing 21 of 27 veterinary colleges in the United States.

Results

Senior veterinary students believed that the human-animal bond should be a concern of practicing veterinarians, but most did not believe they were receiving adequate instruction about the human-animal bond in their veterinary colleges. Gender was significantly related to differences in perceptions; female students appeared to have more interest in addressing the human-animal bond than male students. Students in small animal programs viewed the human-animal bond differently than those in large animal programs. Finally, students attending schools with extensive human-animal bond or human relations curricula were more likely to believe they were receiving adequate instruction in this area than students in other schools.

Conclusions and Clinical Implications

Curricula addressing the human-animal bond need to be developed and implemented in veterinary colleges in the United States. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;215:1428–1432)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To identify factors influencing satisfaction with procedures for small animal euthanasia and to compare the relative importance of those factors among clients, staff, and students at a veterinary teaching hospital.

Design—Survey.

Sample Population—18 nonclinical hospital staff members, 13 clinical staff members, 10 veterinary technicians, 19 veterinary students, and 91 clients.

Procedure—Participants were asked to complete a survey that was designed to assess satisfaction with various aspects of the euthanasia procedure.

Results—Overall response rate was 48% (151/313). Respondents most strongly agreed with the statements that clients should have the option to be present, that having a private place was important, and that employees should be trained to attend to the emotional needs of the client. When asked to place factors in order of importance, those that were ranked the highest included compassionate and caring attitudes of the hospital employees, the option for the client to be present during the euthanasia, and the client being informed and well prepared.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Overall, all groups (nonclinical staff, clinical staff, veterinary technicians, veterinary students, and clients) identified the same factors as being important in the euthanasia of a pet. Results may help facilitate healthy euthanasia experiences. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:1774–1779)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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being developed by veterinary students, in conjunction with The Street Dog Coalition, that will allow pet owners to ride public transportation with their pets without creating a safety threat to other riders or pets. 17 This program includes veterinary

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

have been conducted on the effects of race or ethnicity on pet attachment. 17 One of the few studies 18 exploring the effects of race on pet attachment investigated variations in pet attachment among White and African-American veterinary students

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

practice than were males, which corresponds with findings of previous studies 12–14 involving veterinary students. Compared with individuals who had graduated the most recently, respondents with the longest time since graduation were significantly more

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

-related behaviors per 2 minutes, we performed a bivariate correlation. A Student t test was used to determine whether mean number of stress-related behaviors per 2 minutes for the 7 horses ridden only by the advanced riders was significantly different from mean

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

estimates of cats and dogs in US households and related factors . J Appl Anim Welf Sci 2004 ; 7 : 229 – 241 . 10.1207/s15327604jaws0704_1 14. Faver CA . Sterilization of companion animals: exploring the attitudes and behaviors of Latino students

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association