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staff or veterinary students and 23 client-owned dogs that were admitted to the emergency and intensive care service of the same facility between May 17, 2018, and March 1, 2019, were included in the study. The total sample size of 40 dogs was selected

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objectives

To compare hematologic and serum biochemical variables and plasma ACTH concentration between healthy horses 5 to 12 years old and those more than 20 years old.

Animals

30 healthy horses 5 to 12 years old and 30 healthy horses more than 20 years old.

Procedures

Venous blood was collected from all horses, and CBC and serum biochemical analysis were performed for each horse. Plasma ACTH concentration was determined by radioimmunoassay. Student's paired t-test or the Mann-Whitney rank sum test was used to compare values between control and aged horse groups.

Results

Compared with values for control horses, aged horses had significantly higher erythrocyte mean cell volume and mean cell hemoglobin. Aged horses also had significantly decreased total lymphocyte count. Five aged horses had lymphocyte count that was lower than the low reference limit as established for horses in our laboratory. Differences between control and aged horses for serum biochemical or plasma ACTH values were not significant.

Conclusion

Compared with younger adult horses, those more than 20 years old have some hematologic differences, but there is no apparent effect of aging on baseline plasma ACTH concentration.

Clinical Relevance

It is important to establish age-matched control values for optimal interpretation of clinicopathologic variables. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59: 1247–1251)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

Microcytosis is a common laboratory finding in dogs with congenital portosystemic shunt (pss), although its pathogenesis is not yet understood. Because the most common cause of microcytosis in dogs is absolute or relative iron deficiency, iron status was evaluated in 12 young dogs with pss. Complete blood counting was done before surgical correction in all dogs, and in 5 dogs after surgery, by use of an automated hematology analyzer. Serum iron concentration and total iron-binding capacity (tibc) were determined coulometrically, and percentage of transferrin saturation was calculated. Erythrocyte protoporphyrin content was quantified by use of front-face fluorometry. Serum ferritin concentration was measured by use of elisa. Serum ceruloplasmin content was determined colorimetrically (with p-phenylene-diamine dihydrochloride as substrate) as an indirect indicator of subclinical inflammation, which may result in impaired iron utilization. Special stains were applied to liver (10 dogs; Gomori's) and bone marrow aspiration biopsy (7 dogs; Prussian blue) specimens for qualitative assessment of tissue iron content. Nonpaired Student's t-tests were used to compare serum iron concentration, tibc, percentage of transferrin saturation, and erythrocyte protoporphyrin, ferritin, and ceruloplasmin concentrations in dogs with pss with those in clinically normal dogs. All dogs had microcytosis before surgery; microcytosis resolved in 3 dogs after surgical correction. Serum iron concentration and tibc were significantly lower in pss-affected dogs than in clinically normal dogs. Erythrocyte protoporphyrin, ferritin, and ceruloplasmin concentrations in pss-affected dogs were not significantly different from those in healthy dogs. Excess iron was not detected consistently in liver or bone marrow samples. These results suggest that relative iron deficiency, perhaps associated with altered iron transport and not absolute iron deficiency, is related to microcytosis in dogs with pss.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

analysis —Data were analyzed by use of Student paired 2-tailed t tests c and an ANOVA d to compare Hct values between sites in captive and wild populations. Data were additionally analyzed on the basis of metabolic category of shark by use of the

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

determined by use of the validated immunoassay via a Student t test for paired data. For statistical analysis, plasma cTnI concentration values determined by use of the immunoassay that were < 0.01 ng/mL were considered to be 0 ng/mL. Values of P < 0

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

concurrent diseases known to affect coagulation. Clinically normal dogs owned by students, faculty, and staff of The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center were recruited as controls. All control dogs were determined to be healthy on the basis of

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

platelet function would be decreased, compared with that of fresh platelets. Materials and Methods Control dogs and platelet preparation —Blood was collected from 6 dogs owned by staff veterinarians or veterinary students from the Veterinary Medical

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

whole cell lysates) were compared with negative controls by use of Student t tests. k Similarly, the mean ODs from human recombinant TF negative controls were compared with background (wells containing no reagents) by use of a Student t test. A

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

of hemoglobin or triglycerides on PON1 activity was investigated by use of 1-way ANOVA and Dunnett posttests. Comparisons of the results for serum and EDTA-treated plasma were made by use of a Student t test for repeated measurements. A Student t

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

determination of electrolyte concentrations, pH, and blood gas partial pressures were performed as described elsewhere. 7 Statistical analysis —Data were analyzed via a paired Student t test for comparison between mean values of data reported from both

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research