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cell carcinoma was considered most likely because it is the most common neoplasm affecting ocular and adnexal sites in horses. 1 Ocular squamous cell carcinomas usually involve exophthalmos, although enophthalmos, third eyelid prolapse, and progressive

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

commonly reported neoplasms associated with the bladder include squamous cell carcinoma and transitional cell carcinoma. 7 Squamous cell carcinomas are overrepresented and carry a worse prognosis. 7 As was the case for the mare of the present report

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

squamous cell carcinoma that had expanded the mucosa of the esophagus, infiltrated the esophageal submucosa and muscularis layers, focally invaded into and through the diaphragm, and superficially invaded into the liver. There were frequent keratin pearls

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

). Comments On the basis of gross inspection, chronic juvenile ossifying fibroma, osteoma, fibrous dysplasia, squamous cell carcinoma, oral papilloma, myxoma, myxofibrosarcoma, and exuberant granulation tissue should be considered as differential diagnoses

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

degrees of cytoplasmic keratinization, were intermingled with a large number of anuclear squames. A diagnosis of well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was made. Dexamethasone (0.1 mg/kg [0.045 mg/lb], SC or IV, q 12 h) and saline (0.9% NaCl

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

the left pinna and mild auricular injuries of probable traumatic origin in the right. Left-sided Horner syndrome was also found. A skin biopsy specimen was taken from the left ear, and a diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma was made on the basis of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

) and left guttural pouch were squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). The mass within the left guttural pouch was necrotic and contained remnants of a lymph node, likely due to metastatic spread from the primary sinus mass. The mass seen on CT within the right

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

than infection, given the lack of response to treatment. The smoothly marginated appearance of the lesion made a benign neoplasm more suspect, compared with a malignant one. The most common subungual tumors in dogs are squamous cell carcinoma

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

myelomas, 4 and chondrosarcomas. Examples of tumors with metastasis to bone include hemangiosarcomas, melanomas, fibromas, lymphosarcomas, squamous cell carcinomas, 5 adenocarcinomas, and perirenal carcinomas. 6 Lymphosarcoma is one of the more common

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

larynx down the proximal third of the trachea. Because of the extent of the lesion, the cat was euthanized. Results of histologic examination of the mass were compatible with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Two types of hiatal hernia have been

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association