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Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common feline oral malignancy. 1 It arises from the mucosal epithelial cells in the oral cavity and can invade nearby bone. 2 Although regional lymph node involvement and distant metastasis are relatively rare

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common epithelial neoplasm of the skin and oral cavity of cats. Treatment depends on the anatomic location and the inciting cause. Squamous cell carcinomas in cats can be categorized into 3 forms: oral, UV

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium RNAi RNA interference RT Reverse transcription SCC Squamous cell carcinoma siRNA Small interfering RNA TBS-T Tris buffered saline (0.9% NaCl) solution with 0.1% Tween-20 Footnotes a. Provided by Dr. Tom Rosol

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

IC 50 Molar concentration of compound that inhibits specific activity by 50% ICP-MS Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry SCC Squamous cell carcinoma T max Time to maximum plasma concentration Vdss Volume of distribution at steady state

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

neoplasms, most commonly squamous cell carcinoma. 2–13 Although clinical PDT is still considered an investigational cancer treatment in veterinary medicine, it is efficacious for most of the tumor types treated. 14,15 For various reasons, including lack

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, 3,10,11 and sarcomas. 12 Canine survivin has been identified in histologically normal testicular tissue 13 as well as several types of canine neoplasia, including mast cell tumor, 14 oral squamous cell carcinoma, 14 and urinary bladder TCC. 15

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

; these included oral squamous cell carcinoma (n = 1 cat), cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (1), mammary gland adenocarcinoma (1), and pulmonary carcinoma (1). Carboplatin-associated hematologic information for 6 of these cats has been reported elsewhere

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

cell lines in vitro and against a rat fibrosarcoma cell line in vivo. Finally, the potential clinical efficacy of artemisinin derivatives has been indicated in case reports 22–24 of humans with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma, metastatic uveal

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

an effective chemotherapeutic agent in dogs and cats. Additionally, paclitaxel enhances the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation and may induce cell death in malignant tumors (eg, mammary gland carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, or mastocytomas

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

than cisplatin. 1–3 Additionally, recent studies 1,4–11 have demonstrated cytotoxicity of carboplatin against appendicular osteosarcoma and oral malignant melanoma in dogs as well as oral and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in cats. The adverse

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research