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immediately following euthanasia. Samples of skeletal muscle (epaxial muscles), cardiac muscle (combined atria and ventricle), lung, liver, gallbladder (emptied of bile), pancreas, spleen, kidneys, and testicle were collected. Gross connective tissues and

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To identify eosinophil progenitor cells in feline bone marrow, establishing an assay method to use in studies of eosinophilopoiesis and eosinophilopoietic factors in cats.

Animals

Healthy, laboratory animal source cats.

Procedure

Sources of colony-stimulating activity were prepared by conditioning media with bone marrow, spleen, and blood mononuclear cells from cats infected with Toxocara canis. Bone marrow cells were aspirated and cultured to develop the eosinophil progenitor cell assay and to test cells from 9 healthy cats in the assay.

Results

Optimal conditions for identifying colonyforming units-eosinophil and cluster-forming units-eosinophil were as follows. Bone marrow mononuclear cells (105) were plated in 1 ml of supplemented medium, fetal bovine serum, and agar. The source of eosinophil growth factor(s) was bone marrow-conditioned medium made in the presence of 2.5 µg of concanavalin A/ml; other conditioned media also supported eosinophil colony growth. Dishes were incubated for 7 days at 37 C and 7% CO2. The colonyforming units-eosinophil formed aggregates of > 50 Luxol fast blue-positive cells and had dispersed morphology; the cluster-forming units-eosinophil formed aggregates of < 50 cells.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance

Similar to other species, cats have separate and distinct eosinophil progenitor cells. The eosinophil progenitor assay may be used to characterize altered kinetics of eosinophilopoiesis, to assess eosinophil growth factors, and to evaluate therapeutic regimens that might be useful in the management of excess eosinophil production. (Am J Vet Res 1997; 58:348-353)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

(83%) dogs included hepatocellular necrosis and infarcts in the spleen, kidneys, liver, lungs, or heart. In addition, the severity of lesions was correlated with the degree of leukocytosis, which suggests an association between the inflammatory

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, spleen, and kidney). 8 Eosinophils are proinflammatory leukocytes with a wide range of functions. In humans with eosinophilic gastroenteritis, eosinophils can be found in all levels of the affected mucosa 9 and a correlation exists between degree of

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

reactions and euthanized with CO 2 for collection of blood for antibody extraction at the end of the treatments. Serum was collected after blood coagulation and centrifugation. 25 After euthanasia, excision and gentle homogenization of the spleen for

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia is a well-characterized systemic inflammatory disorder of dogs that can lead to fatal thromboembolism. 1 Large and small vessel thrombi are commonly identified in the spleen, lungs, and catheterized veins of dogs

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research