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subsequent fluid analysis and microbial culture was recommended to detect inflammation or infectious organisms. Given the dog's lack of response to treatment, additional serologic testing to detect fungal and respiratory diseases was considered, depending on

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A 6-year-old sexually intact male Weimaraner presented to the Dick White Referrals neurology service with a history of 3 months of infrequent upper respiratory stertor, 1 week of changed bark, and 2 days of vestibular ataxia, right

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

respiratory rate were within reference limits; however, increased respiratory effort was noted. A splayed hind limb posture at rest was evident. Etiologic diagnosis— Differential diagnoses considered for sudden onset, nonprogressive hind limb

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

/L [reference interval, 14.5 to 23.1 mmol/L]), a compensatory respiratory alkalosis (pCO2, 22.6 mm Hg [reference interval, 23.7 to 43.9 mm Hg]), hyponatremia (142.7 mmol/L [reference interval, 143.0 to 151.1 mmol/L]), hypokalemia (3.55 mmol/L [reference interval

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

dog's mentation remained dull and it was referred for further evaluation. Historically, the dog had had multiple infections of the ears and skin and an upper respiratory tract infection. The dog had free access to the property where it lived, on which

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

carprofen, maropitant, and enrofloxacin prior to the referral evaluation. General physical examination revealed bradycardia (60 beats/min) and an abnormal respiratory pattern with little thoracic movement during the inspiratory phase. The dog's peripheral

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, blindness, coma, and death can occur at values > 400 mOsm/kg. 1 The causes of hypernatremia are related to free water loss (eg, heatstroke, fever, burns, respiratory infections, diabetes insipidus, osmotic diuresis, osmotic diarrhea, and emesis

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

were detected during auscultation of the heart and lungs; heart and respiratory rates were within reference limits. The mucous membranes were pink and slightly dry with a capillary refill time of < 2 seconds. Marked atrophy of the right temporalis

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

referral evaluation, the dog was persistently panting with an increased respiratory effort, but rectal temperature (37.6°C [99.7°F]) and heart rate (102 beats/min) were within reference limits. A search of the dog's body for ticks was performed, but none

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

ponazaril, toltrazuril, decoquinate, and levamisole) for equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). Heart and respiratory rates were within reference limits, and rectal temperature was slightly high (38.7°C [101.7°F]). The remainder of the physical

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association