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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To assess proportionate mortality ratios (PMRs) for suicide among male and female US veterinarians from 1979 through 2015.

DESIGN PMR study.

SAMPLE Death records for 11,620 veterinarians.

PROCEDURES Information for veterinarians who died during 1979 through 2015 was obtained from AVMA obituary and life insurance databases and submitted to a centralized database of US death records to obtain underlying causes of death. Decedent data that met records-matching criteria were imported into a software program for calculation of PMRs for suicide stratified by sex and indirectly standardized for age, race, and 5-year calendar period with 95% confidence intervals.

RESULTS 398 deaths resulted from suicide; 326 (82%) decedents were male, 72 (18%) were female, and most (298 [75%]) were ≤ 65 years of age. The PMRs for suicide for all veterinarian decedents (2.1 and 3.5 for males and females, respectively), those in clinical positions (2.2 and 3.4 for males and females, respectively), and those in nonclinical positions (1.8 and 5.0 for males and females, respectively) were significantly higher than for the general US population. Among female veterinarians, the percentage of deaths by suicide was stable from 2000 until the end of the study, but the number of such deaths subjectively increased with each 5-year period.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results of the study indicated that PMRs for suicide of female as well as male veterinarians were higher than for the general population. These data may help to inform stakeholders in the creation and implementation of suicide prevention strategies designed for veterinarians.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To analyze data for death of veterinary professionals and veterinary students, with manner of death characterized as suicide or undetermined intent from 2003 through 2014.

SAMPLE

Death records for 202 veterinary professionals and veterinary students.

PROCEDURES

Decedents employed as veterinarians, veterinary technicians or technologists, or veterinary assistants or laboratory animal caretakers and veterinary students who died by suicide or of undetermined intent were identified through retrospective review of National Violent Death Reporting System records. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated, and mechanisms and circumstances of death were compared among veterinary occupational groups.

RESULTS

197 veterinary professionals and 5 veterinary students had deaths by suicide or of undetermined intent. Among decedents employed at the time of death, SMRs for suicide of male and female veterinarians (1.6 and 2.4, respectively) and male and female veterinary technicians or technologists (5.0 and 2.3, respectively) were significantly greater than those for the general US population, whereas SMRs for suicide of male and female veterinary assistants or laboratory animal caretakers were not. Poisoning was the most common mechanism of death among veterinarians; the drug most commonly used was pentobarbital. For most (13/18) veterinarians who died of pentobarbital poisoning, the death-related injury occurred at home. When decedents with pentobarbital poisoning were excluded from analyses, SMRs for suicide of male and female veterinarians, but not veterinary technicians or technologists, did not differ significantly from results for the general population.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested higher SMRs for suicide among veterinarians might be attributable to pentobarbital access. Improving administrative controls for pentobarbital might be a promising suicide prevention strategy among veterinarians; however, different strategies are likely needed for veterinary technicians or technologists.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

This paper reports the results of a survey conducted among members of the American Association of Equine Practitioners, concerning medical problems of adult horses. A one-page questionnaire listing 36 medical problems grouped by body system was completed by 1,149 veterinarians. The top-ranked disease was colic, followed by viral respiratory tract disease, endometritis, dermatitis, and parasitism. When responses were evaluated by type of practice, location of practice, and number of veterinarians in the practice, ranking of the top 2 diseases was the same for the total respondents. Ranking of diseases 3 through 5 varied when these criteria were taken into consideration.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Thirty-nine and 47 randomly selected Colorado cow-calf operations participated in the National Animal Health Monitoring System (NAHMS) during rounds 2 (October 1986 to September 1987) and 3 (October 1987 to September 1988), respectively. Data on the incidence of disease conditions within each herd were collected by federal and state Veterinary Medical Officers and university veterinarians through monthly visits to the ranches. Annual disease incidence for disease classes and the most frequently reported individual disease conditions were determined and expressed on a per 100 cow basis.

The mean annual disease incidences for all diseases in these herds were 48.8 and 47.7 new cases per 100 cows for rounds 2 and 3, respectively. The ranges for herd annual disease incidence were wide in both study years.

The enteric disease class had the highest mean annual disease incidence in both years of the study, and this was primarily because of diarrhea of unknown cause in calves. Diarrhea of unknown cause accounted for approximately 25% of all new disease cases in both rounds of the study. The mean annual disease incidences were not different for any disease class between the two rounds.

The data indicate that, on the average, diarrhea of unknown cause, pneumonia, dystocia, foot rot (interdigital necrobacillosis), pinkeye (infectious keratoconjunctivitis), respiratory tract infection, death of unknown cause, and nonpregnancy had the highest incidences in these Colorado beef herds during the study period. However, because of the wide variation of the predominant disease problems between herds, a herd's disease history as well as the common disease problems in the geographic area of a herd must be considered in designing a herd health program.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Emerging zoonotic diseases are a growing concern in the public health community. Of 175 species of pathogens classified as emerging, 132 (75%) are zoonotic. 1 Diseases associated with these pathogens include severe acute respiratory syndrome and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

) • Vaccination • Prevention of wildlife exposure * Canine infectious respiratory disease complex † (kennel cough) Common especially among those in group housing or high dog-to-dog contact a ; highly contagious Mild to moderate Direct contact

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Micotil 300 Injection a is an injectable formulation of tilmicosin phosphate that was approved by the US FDA in March 1992 for use in the treatment of bovine respiratory tract disease associated with Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

pose both respiratory and physical health hazards to animal caregivers and veterinary personnel. 23,24 Asthma, allergies, hearing loss, frostbite, and other conditions are all possible hazards of the veterinary work environment. Reproductive hazards

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

neutering patients with mild infectious or noninfectious medical conditions, such as upper respiratory tract infection, parasite infestation, or subclinical heartworm disease. Although some conditions may theoretically increase the risk of anesthetic

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association