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that develops as a result of nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism is a commonly diagnosed metabolic bone disease in iguanas. Nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism can affect mammals, birds, and reptiles. In lizards, nutritional secondary

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Haversian canals lined by endothelium and bone marrow–filled spaces. H&E stain; bar = 40 μm. Morphologic Diagnosis Primary osteoma cutis (benign). Comments Osteomata in reptiles have been reported. 1,2 Such lesions typically originate

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, green anoles ( Anolis carolinensis ), and members of an unknown species of grass lizard ( Takydromus sp) from a captive-bred source were among the affected reptiles. Husbandry was deemed adequate. The lizards' diet consisted of dusted crickets and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

-mouthed breathing. Treatment was instituted and included SC fluid therapy with reptile Ringer's solution (50% lactated Ringer's solution, 25% saline [0.9% NaCl] solution, and 25% solution of 5% dextrose in water) with vitamin B (30 to 35 mL, 2 times/wk), multiple

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

summary: marked leukocytosis as a result of end-stage bacteremia or septicemia in a diamond python. Comments Melanomacrophages are a major component of the mononuclear phagocytic system of fish, amphibians, and reptiles. 2 Because they have

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

staining specific for factor VIII–related antigen. The heart of reptiles (order Squamata) is composed of 3 chambers: 2 atria and 1 ventricle that is divided by an incomplete septum. The single ventricle is composed of 3 chambers termed the cavum

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Comments Neoplasia is frequently encountered in the practice of reptile medicine, 1,2 although neoplastic diseases in reptiles were once thought to be rare. 3 The prevalence of neoplastic disease in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

(SCC) of the skin of the upper right eyelid. Comments Neoplasia is increasingly identified as a disease process in reptiles. Results of retrospective studies 1–3 in chelonians, snakes, lizards, and crocodilians have indicated that skin tumors

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

affected, the gross and histologic lesions, and the presence of intralesional amoebic trophozoites; however, a definitive diagnosis relies on results from an immunofluorescence or PCR assay because nonpathogenic commensal amoeba can be present in reptiles

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

environmental factors, and a variety of bacterial species, such as Aeromonas spp, Pseudomonas spp, Staphylococcus spp, and Morganella spp, may be involved. 3 Fungal dermatitis in reptiles is typically related to compromised host immunity, and infections

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association