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( Figure 2 ) . Considering the patient age, breed and multifocal clinical presentation, the primary differential diagnosis was infectious osteomyelitis (fungal Aspergillus spp were considered most likely due to the patient signalment) with suspicion of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

be seen and has a prominent gas-fluid interface (white arrows). The oval highlights multiple fragments (oval) are visible at the cranial angle of the scapula. The findings were considered to represent suppurative osteomyelitis of the scapula

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

diagnoses included hematogenous osteomyelitis and hypertrophic osteodystrophy (HOD). Primary or metastatic neoplasia were considered less likely because of the dog's young age. Figure 2— Same left antebrachial radiographic images as in Figure 1 . A

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

with absence of joint effusion ( Figure 2 ). These radiographic changes are consistent with an aggressive bone lesion, and differential diagnoses include bacterial or mycotic osteomyelitis, primary bone tumor, and metastatic bone tumor. Figure 2

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

radiographic diagnosis is mixed polyostotic sclerosis and lysis, lack of coelomic detail, possible hepatomegaly, and intestinal ileus. Differential diagnoses include disseminated bacterial or mycotic osteomyelitis and hepatitis (possibly caused by

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

right hip joint dysplasia and degenerative joint disease. The small oval radiolucency in the right hip joint acetabulum may be a lytic lesion suggestive of osteomyelitis. Comments The dog underwent surgery for a femoral head and neck ostectomy of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

was evident but only on the caudocranial projection. On the basis of findings, our primary differential diagnoses included osteomyelitis with potential septic arthritis of the right stifle joint, an unusually irregular subchondral cystic lesion with

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

diagnoses for this aggressive bone lesion were bacterial or fungal osteomyelitis, with primary or metastatic neoplasia less likely. Treatment and Outcome Cytologic evaluation of ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspirates of the lytic lesion of the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

diagnosis of intraosseous pneumatosis of the proximal aspect of the right humerus and intra-articular emphysema likely associated with septic osteomyelitis of the right humeral head. Less likely differential diagnoses included neoplasia and trauma

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

with secondary angular limb deformity (ie, bilateral radius curvus and carpal valgus) was considered most likely. Hypertrophic osteodystrophy and metaphyseal osteomyelitis were considered unlikely, as there was no pain elicited on palpation of the limbs

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association