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the suspected osteomyelitis lesion in the dog, so the surgical plan was created to extract the affected teeth, remove sequestrum, and obtain adequate samples for biopsy and cultures. In brief, a mucoperiosteal flap was elevated to facilitate surgical

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. The histopathologic diagnosis was severe, regionally extensive, chronic, neutrophilic, and lymphoplasmacytic osteomyelitis and stomatitis with bony remodeling ( Figure 3 ). The dog was subsequently administered clindamycin (17.2 mg/kg [7.8 mg/lb], PO

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

the mandibular fossa had irregular osseous proliferation and osteolysis consistent with osteomyelitis. There were a few small, hyperattenuating fragments medial and lateral to the main fragment. Additionally, multiple peripherally contrast

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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, with less bone being laid down overall than is being absorbed. 1 This radiologic pattern represents an aggressive, fast-growing lesion such as osteomyelitis or neoplasia. 1 In addition, endosteal scalloping, as observed in this cat, may represent the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

were consistent with apical periodontitis at the distal root of the right mandibular first molar tooth, with bone sequestration and chronic osteomyelitis. 2 The solid periosteal reaction on the ventral aspect of the mandible was considered likely

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

evident with a large amount of surrounding soft tissue swelling still present. Taken together, the radiographic views illustrated the development of an acquired inflammatory intraosseous lesion (subperiosteal osteomyelitis) secondary to endodontic disease

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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premolar tooth has 3 roots. Retained root tips and endodontic disease of the adjacent teeth were ruled out. 1,2 Although no radiographic signs of osteomyelitis were observed, acute osteomyelitis could not be ruled out because acute osteomyelitis may

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

suggestive of periodontal and endodontic disease with secondary osteomyelitis. Figure 2— Same radiographic view as in Figure 1 . The crowns of the left mandibular fourth premolar tooth and first and second molar teeth have enamel defects (asterisks

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

osteomyelitis by means of radiography can at times be difficult, the presence of osteomyelitis in the case described in the present report was less likely. A benign or malignant neoplastic process was considered to be unlikely. Treatment and Outcome With

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, chondrosarcoma with endochondral ossification, osteoma, odontogenic neoplasms, and multilobular tumor of bone. 1–3 Nonneoplastic lesions, such as exostosis, foreign body granuloma, abscess, bacterial or fungal osteomyelitis, and eosinophilic granuloma, were also

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association