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Virulent and toxigenic Escherichia coli strains are responsible for a number of diseases in humans and other animals, ranging from diarrhea in children and neonatal livestock to life-threatening extraintestinal infections. In humans, strains of

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Enteric clostridiosis in equine neonates can result in life-threatening disease and has been associated with a high mortality rate in the early neonatal period. 1– 3 Clostridium perfringens is one of the most important enteric pathogens

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

maltolate is bioavailable when given orally to neonatal foals. 12,19,20 On the basis of these findings, it has been proposed that gallium could suppress the growth of or kill intracellular R equi when prophylactically administered to susceptible neonatal

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

. Bacterial culture of blood is the current gold-standard test with which to diagnose sepsis in foals. However, in critically ill neonates with suspected bacteremia, antimicrobials are often administered before the collection of blood samples for culture

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli are an important and global cause of diarrhea in neonatal and weaned pigs. 1 Strains of ETEC depend on 2 main types of virulence factors (adhesins and enterotoxins) to cause enteric colibacillosis in pigs. 2

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

not typically become apparent until foals are 30 to 90 days old; however, there is evidence that most affected foals become infected during the neonatal period. Foals < 2 weeks old are more susceptible to experimental infection with R equi , compared

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

of > 45, which is a value considered as genetic material that is not detectable. Interestingly, that inoculum was found to be infectious in 1 of 4 neonatal pigs. 13 Additionally, the response was age dependent, with a much lower minimum infectious

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

diarrhea in Oregon and Hawaii and human vesicular lesions. SMSV-8 1.964 Prototype virus recovered from a neonatal Alaskan fur seal. SMSV-9 2.640 Prototype virus recovered from a premature neonatal California sea lion; additional isolates

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

fetuses and infection of neonates via colostrum ingestion have been investigated and transmission is estimated to be 3% to 18% and 12%, respectively. 5–9 Infection of off-spring during parturition has been postulated to occur but has not been investigated

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, a result of which is microflora that is more effective at excluding Salmonella spp than the neonatal microflora. Diet changes during this period could be a reason for the enteric flora shift. Most liquid diets used on dairy farms and calf ranches

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research