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Respiratory distress is a common problem in veterinary medicine. Regardless of the cause, treatment of respiratory distress includes the provision of supplemental oxygen. Conventional oxygen therapy provided by use of a mask, nasal cannula, hood

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

interference, which may be beneficial in young calves. Augmentation of the host's immune system is another alternative for prevention of BRD. The upper portion of the respiratory tract (nose, nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, pharynx, and larynx; upper

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Administration of supplemental oxygen is commonly performed to increase the oxygen content of blood in hypoxemic neonatal foals. 1 In a neonatal foal, oxygen can be provided via a face mask, nasal cannula, or transtracheal catheter or by means of

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

nasopharynx (transorally or through one of the nasal airways). Alternatively, in experimental settings, the tube may be placed directly into the nasopharynx by use of a piercing canula. With posterior rhinomanometry, both airways are investigated

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Supplemental oxygen is commonly administered to patients to prevent or resolve hypoxemia in clinical veterinary practice. There are various methods to provide supplemental oxygen, including delivery via a nasal insufflation catheter, flow-by, face

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

to determine associations of circulating cTnI concentrations, hematologic variables, serum biochemical analysis variables, and thermographically determined orbit and nasal planum surface temperatures with the onset and severity of pneumonia associated

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

wafting oxygen can be provided via oxygen tubing or a simple mask. 7 In adult horses, this technique is often not feasible as untrained horses will rarely tolerate a mask. Therefore, in both foals and adult horses, placement of a nasal cannula is the most

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

(reflecting thoracic motion) in all alpacas, which yielded a mean ± SD minimal phase angle of 19.59 ± 10.06° in standing alpacas and 17.56 ± 9.12° in sternally recumbent alpacas. B—The nasal flow (V' N ) measured by use of a pneumotachograph and sum of the

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

/kg, respectively). A rodent cheek dilator and mouth gag were fitted in place, and rabbits were maintained on a mixture of isoflurane (≤ 2%) and oxygen via nasal mask throughout the procedure. Bronchoscopy was performed with a 3.8 mm × 55 cm videoendoscope a for

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

obtained at the time of IOS measurement by the same investigator (LT), who was unaware of each horse's treatment. For clinical scores, nasal flaring was scored as previously described 20 from 1 to 4 as follows: 1 = no flaring, 2 = slight, occasional

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research