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An 8-year-old 28.6-kg (62.9-lb) spayed female Border Collie mix was evaluated because of progressive left thoracic limb lameness of approximately 1 year's duration. Previously, a diagnosis of degenerative disease of the carpal joint had been made

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction A 4-month-old 17.5-kg neutered male Boxer was referred to the neurology department of a referral veterinary hospital for evaluation of a 3-day history of acute-onset progressive reluctance to walk, right pelvic limb lameness

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

An 8-year-old 37.1-kg (81.6-lb) sexually intact male pit bull-type dog was referred to the University of Georgia because of a 3-month history of left pelvic limb lameness. Three months prior to the referral evaluation, the dog was chasing water

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A 10-year-old 4-kg (8.8-lb) neutered male domestic shorthair cat was evaluated because of a 3-month history of slowly progressive left thoracic limb lameness and weakness, followed by the additional onset of bilateral pelvic limb ataxia the week

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A 7-year-old 34.1-kg (75-lb) castrated male pit bull–type dog was evaluated because of sudden-onset, rapidly progressive tetraparesis. Approximately 48 hours earlier, the owner noticed that the dog had left thoracic limb lameness. There was

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction A 1-year-old 24.8-kg neutered male Collie cross was referred for neurologic evaluation because of a 3-week history of right pelvic limb lameness that had progressed to ambulatory paraparesis. Radiography performed by the referring

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A 12-year-old 33-kg Labrador Retriever was presented for chronic, progressive, nonpainful left pelvic limb lameness of 6 months’ duration. An inciting cause was not noted by the owner. Three weeks prior to presentation, lack of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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condition in canids. Most affected dogs develop chronic lameness or exercise-induced collapse. 1–3 The dog of this report had a relatively sudden onset of signs (acute paraparesis within a 24-hour period) and developed muscle pain secondary to the ischemia

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

systems. 3 At the time of initial evaluation, the most common clinical signs of those affected horses were dyspnea, swelling of the subcutaneous and muscular tissues, epistaxis, and lameness. Among the 35 horses, hemangiosarcoma was most frequently

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

radiographic view of the thoracolumbar portion of the vertebral column of a cat with a 7-week history of pelvic limb lameness. Notice the ventral spondylosis of the T11, T12, T13, and L1 vertebrae; narrowing of the intervertebral disk space, vertebral foramen

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association