Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 76 items for :

  • Musculoskeletal System x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Trauma and diseases that cause lameness are the most common medical problems in horses. 1–7 Especially within the racehorse industry, economic losses attributable to lameness are substantial. 8 Also, catastrophic injuries in racehorses, which

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Ground reaction forces obtained by use of force platform gait analysis are an important objective outcome measurement in canine clinical trials. The PVF and VI correlate with lameness severity. 1,2 The PVF represents the maximal load exerted by a

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Lameness is the most common cause of poor performance of racing and sport horses. 1,2 The mainstay for evaluation of gait abnormalities is subjective lameness assessment by an experienced equine practitioner and grading with an interval scale

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Degenerative injury to the PA in horses causes chronic forelimb lameness because of pain arising from the navicular bone and soft tissues of the PA, such as the CSLs, distal sesamoidean impar ligament, podotrochlear bursa (ie, NB), and deep

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

In horses, lameness is the most common reason for changes in gait pattern and is associated with alterations in the use of all parts of the locomotor system. 1 Compensatory changes and the resultant nonaligned weight bearing lead to overload and

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

musculoskeletal pain or lameness associated with osteoarthritis. Clinical assessments were conducted 3 times during an approximately 14-day period by each horse's primary-care veterinarian and by each horse's daily caregiver. Furthermore, we examined the data to

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

to kinetic gait analysis, but little agreement has been found between scoring systems, and the results most accurately refect force plate gait analysis findings only when the lameness is severe. 2,3 Gillette and Angle 4 reviewed recent developments

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

redistribution pattern 20-23 have been investigated during induced lameness in dogs and horses. The load decrease in the injured limb and the compensatory load increase in the contralateral limb are becoming clearer. However, no comparison of symmetry between

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, quick, portable, and objective means of gait evaluation for routine clinical applications. Because decreases in PVF and VI have been associated with lameness in dogs, these variables are commonly assessed in gait analysis. 4–8 Furthermore, vertical

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

the most common causes of forelimb lameness in Western performance horses. 1–3 In addition to exercise modifications and therapeutic farriery, many medical and surgical treatments have been described. 4,5 Unfortunately, most of these modalities yield

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research