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Pennsylvania (1998 to 2002), and Louisiana State University (1999 to 2001) were examined. Age; sex; and, when available, information regarding the duration of lameness prior to evaluation and the grade of lameness 14 at evaluation were obtained. The diagnosis

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

population of dogs evaluated at the teaching hospital of the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine is 1% (146/14,595). The most common signs of LS disease are hind limb lameness, hind limb paresis, and LS pain. Other signs may include

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

damage and osteoarthritis, enthesiopathy, osteomyelitis, and bone neoplasia. 5 The precise clinical importance of BMLs in horses is not yet entirely elucidated because lameness is often multifactorial, 6 and BMLs may or may not be closely related to the

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Adysplastic elbow joint (elbow dysplasia) is one of the most common causes of forelimb lameness in dogs. Elbow dysplasia is used to describe developmental abnormalities of the elbow joint in dogs and encompasses 4 primary lesions (FCP, ununited

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

variation in signal intensity in healthy horses is crucial for correct interpretation of MRI scans obtained from lame horses. Generally, a collateral ligament should have uniform low signal intensity in all MRI sequences. In the present study, the collateral

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

. Each had been referred to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of the University of Perugia for examination for lameness, and each received complete lameness and neurologic examinations. To be included in the study, horses were required to be deemed free

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

fragmentation of the MCP were used. Dogs that were referred to the Clinique Vétérinaire de l'Ouest between June 1997 and July 1999 for forelimb lameness and signs of pain on palpation of the elbow joint were included in this study. Dogs were excluded from the

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

parameters. Follow-up Changes in appetite and abnormal clinical signs, such as pain, lameness, or swelling of the paws, were determined from the medical reports or with follow-up calls. Only 1 cat had mild swelling of the paws after the procedure

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Injuries and abnormalities involving the soft tissues and bones in the tarsal region of horses have been well described. 1–7 Many of these conditions manifest primarily as lameness, but some may also result in joint effusion or diffuse swelling

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

The stifle joint is an important source of lameness in all types of horses. 1,2 Because of its clinical importance, anatomically normal stifle joints and stifle joints with pathological changes have been studied extensively via radiography 3

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research