Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 60 items for :

  • Biomechanics x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Lameness is an important and prevalent medical condition in horses 1 and accounts for up to $1 billion in losses for the US equine industry annually. 2 Horses with subclinical or mild lameness have suboptimal performance, 3,4 and mild lameness

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Lameness is one of the most important medical issues of horses 1 and accounts for annual losses up to $1 billion for the US equine industry. 2 Horses with subclinical or mild lameness often have suboptimal performance. 3,4 Early detection of

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

supported by both forelimbs or both hind limbs is used to identify whether a dog is clinically sound or lame. 13–20 In an attempt to unload an injured limb, an animal will alter the load distribution among the limbs. Most studies have focused on the limb

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Lameness is the most common and expensive medical problem of horses. 1 The present standard of practice for detection and evaluation of lameness involves observing horses in motion and then grading lameness severity with an interval scale, such

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

equal in magnitude but opposite in direction to the net internal force generated during locomotion. These data are precise and repeatable. 3–7 However, the relationships between subjective lameness scores and GRF data are not yet fully understood, even

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

developed and described. Consequently, the effect of pain on hip joint function and pelvic limb gait has not been evaluated, and the unique characteristics of lameness associated with hip joint disease have yet to be determined with instrumented gait

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Lameness is one of the most common medical issues of horses, affecting 8 to 14 horses/100 horses examined. 1,2 In addition, mild and subclinical lameness can result in reduced and suboptimal performance by equine athletes. 3,4 Because mild

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-breed dogs had a body type comparable to that of the 6 purebred dogs). All dogs were subjected to thorough orthopedic 16 and clinical and neurologic 17 examinations. Degree of lameness 18 and signs of pain were scored on a 5-point scale. 18 The diagnosis

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

evaluated before inclusion in the present study; the evaluation included a lameness examination, assessment of body condition, range of motion (flexion) testing of the carpal joints, evaluation for the presence of effusion in middle carpal joints, and

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

must increase as a function of decreasing circle radius and increasing speed. Even when an animal is leaning into the circle, the total resultant force is then no longer aligned with gravity. During an equine clinical lameness examination, the

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research