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History A 6-year-old Thoroughbred mare presented to a tertiary referral center for evaluation of a neck injury sustained 5 days prior. The mare had been evaluated by her primary veterinarian on the farm the day of injury. Severe painful soft

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, there was mild widening of the medial aspect of the middle carpal joint and the articulation between the second carpal and metacarpal bones, suggestive of injury to the medial collateral ligament of the carpus. Moderate soft tissue swelling was evident

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

injury to the medial collateral, intercarpal, and carpometacarpal ligaments. Avulsion of the accessory carpal bone has been well documented in racing Greyhounds. This type of injury most commonly occurs in the right forelimb and is attributable to racing

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

evaluation (performed 10 minutes following acute injury) revealed an inability to bear weight or extend the affected hind limb. Attempts to manually extend the left hind limb were unsuccessful. Initially, no heat or swelling was identified. Approximately 1

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

fracture, ALSDFT desmitis, and septic tenosynovitis. Comments Desmitis of the ALSDFT is not a common injury although it occurs spontaneously in sport and racehorses. 3 Ultrasonography is considered an essential diagnostic tool for accurate

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

basis of physical examination findings, initial differential diagnoses included traumatic cranial cruciate ligament rupture or caudal cruciate ligament rupture, tibial tuberosity avulsion, Salter-Harris type fracture, or injury to other soft tissue

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

catastrophic injury. These conditions were deemed unlikely because of the filly's normal radiographic bone opacity, the acute appearance of the fractures, lack of evidence of underlying pathological fractures, and absence of other congenital or developmental

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A 5-year-old 600-kg German Warmblood mare was presented with lameness in the left hind limb and swelling of the left stifle joint. Two months earlier, the mare had jumped out of a water treadmill and sustained several injuries on both

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

and axis are common after traumatic injuries to the cranial cervical portion of the vertebral column. 1 However, luxations of the atlanto-occipital (AO) joint have been infrequently reported in dogs and cats. 2–6 Traumatic injuries of sufficient

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

injuries of the pelvis in horses. 3–5 Ultrasonographic findings that support a diagnosis of pelvic fracture include an irregular cortical contour (roughened surface and a step or gap in the bone surface) and evidence of soft tissue damage (fluid

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association