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. Figure 3— Same ultrasonographic image as Figure 2 . Notice the accumulation of anechoic fluid within the scrotum (A) that is most likely blood or, because of the chronic nature of the injury, a serosanguineous fluid. The echogenic character of 2 areas

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

was injured while attempting to jump over a fence. Cranial is to the right. We postulated that the initial injury resulted in delayed development of a stricture of the prepuce, which ultimately impeded urine drainage. Accumulation of urine in the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

days after the vaginal injury and surgical correction. Transrectal palpation did not reveal abnormalities in the reproductive tract. Ultrasonographic findings revealed a corpus luteum in the left ovary, which confirmed that the mare was in diestrus

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

was able to extend and retract the penis through the preputial ring and sheath on his own, the purse-string suture was removed (approx 2 to 3 weeks after discharge). At 6 weeks after the injury, the stallion's penis and prepuce appeared grossly normal

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

variable signs, depending on the type of fracture and extent of soft tissue injury. Clinical signs include dysuria and hematuria, evidence of pain and crepitus during manipulation of the penis, distention of the urinary bladder, and evidence of abdominal

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

intromission. There was no history of previous injury or penile trauma. The bull had no evidence of muscle atrophy. No genital abnormalities were identified during physical examination, which included manual extension and examination of the penis. A breeding

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A 4-year-old Standardbred stallion was retired from racing because of an injury to a tendon in the right forelimb. The owners intended to sell the stallion for use as a stud. A series of prepurchase semen evaluations conducted by

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

?. Answer Trauma-induced hematoma or seroma, peritesticular hematoma or abscess, penile injury, orchitis attributable to Brucella suis , testicular neoplasia, testicular abscess, inguinal hernia, rupture of the bladder or urethra, penile hematoma, or

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

congenital anomalies (eg, aberrant or blind efferent ductules), infectious agents that lead to epididymitis, traumatic injuries, autoimmune reactions, vascular lesions, and adenomyosis of the epididymis secondary to estrogen. 4 Congenitally malformed

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

direct hernia survive more than 4 to 6 days after injury. Because adhesions prevent manual reduction of the herniated intestine, and vascular compromise following strangulation is common, surgical repair via an inguinal approach in an anesthetized animal

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association