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Nationwide, CVTs are at potential risk of traumatic occupational injuries, with associated financial losses. Although, to our knowledge, there are currently no reports of studies focused on injuries to CVTs, several studies 1–7 have investigated

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

million/y. 2,3 In addition, there are also costs associated with medical insurance, workers’ compensation, lost wages, sick leave–associated business costs, and physical and emotional damage to injured persons. Among bite-related injuries treated in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

and narcotics to general patrol work and scent tracking. As threats engaged by military forces have changed, the training and use of MWDs have evolved to meet the challenge. Several reports 3–7 have described combat-related injuries to MWDs, but to

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Animals are an integral part of the lives of many Americans. An estimated 39% of United States households include ≥ 1 dog, and 33% include ≥ 1 cat. 1 Many occupations and certain hobbies also put individuals at increased risk of injury from

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

included > 600 variables coded by state data abstractors who were trained according to CDC standards and used all available data sources; the variables included information on the manner of death, characteristics of injury and death, and weapons, suspects

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To summarize breeds of dogs involved in fatal human attacks during a 20-year period and to assess policy implications.

Animals—Dogs for which breed was reported involved in attacks on humans between 1979 and 1998 that resulted in human dog bite-related fatalities (DBRF).

Procedure—Data for human DBRF identified previously for the period of 1979 through 1996 were combined with human DBRF newly identified for 1997 and 1998. Human DBRF were identified by searching news accounts and by use of The Humane Society of the United States' registry databank.

Results—During 1997 and 1998, at least 27 people died of dog bite attacks (18 in 1997 and 9 in 1998). At least 25 breeds of dogs have been involved in 238 human DBRF during the past 20 years. Pit bull-type dogs and Rottweilers were involved in more than half of these deaths. Of 227 reports with relevant data, 55 (24%) human deaths involved unrestrained dogs off their owners' property, 133 (58%) involved unrestrained dogs on their owners' property, 38 (17%) involved restrained dogs on their owners' property, and 1 (< 1%) involved a restrained dog off its owner's property.

Conclusions—Although fatal attacks on humans appear to be a breed-specific problem (pit bull-type dogs and Rottweilers), other breeds may bite and cause fatalities at higher rates. Because of difficulties inherent in determining a dog's breed with certainty, enforcement of breed-specific ordinances raises constitutional and practical issues. Fatal attacks represent a small proportion of dog bite injuries to humans and, therefore, should not be the primary factor driving public policy concerning dangerous dogs. Many practical alternatives to breed-specific ordinances exist and hold promise for prevention of dog bites. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:836–840)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

2015. Black, white, and gray stacked bars indicate deaths incurred by pharmaceutical poisoning, firearm injury, and other methods, respectively. Occupational positions were classified as clinical if decedents had general practice listed as their

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

The veterinary profession has a greater than average risk for occupational disease and injury, compared with many other occupations. 1–3 This includes reportedly high risks of leukemia, cancers of the brain, zoonotic diseases, unplanned abortion

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association