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reported the short-term impact of working in veterinary medicine, which indicated animal-related injuries such as kicks, bites, scratches, and needlesticks were the most commonly reported. 1 – 3 , 5 , 6 However, no known studies have evaluated the long

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

outcome of a surgical repair of a vertebral fracture in a rabbit. The surgical repair of any orthopedic injury is considered more difficult in rabbits than in dogs or cats due to the size and relatively brittle nature of rabbit bones. 5 Although rabbits

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate anatomic reduction and surgical stabilization of femoral capital physeal fractures in cats.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—13 cats.

Procedure—Medical records of cats with unilateral or bilateral femoral capital physeal fractures evaluated from 1998 to 2002 were reviewed. Age and weight of cats at the time of surgery; breed; sex; concurrent injuries; severity of lameness before and 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after surgery; the amount of fracture reduction achieved and number of Kirschner wires (K-wires) used; degree of degenerative joint disease of the hip joint and lysis of the femoral neck and head observed after surgery; whether K-wires were removed after surgery; and complications after surgery were evaluated.

Results—Thirteen cats with 16 capital physeal fractures were identified. There was significant improvement in the severity of clinical lameness in all cats from weeks 1 through 4 after surgery. There was no correlation between the scores of the individuals who evaluated radiographs for fracture reduction and placement of K-wires.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that surgical stabilization and repair of femoral capital physeal fractures facilitate a short recovery period and a good prognosis for return to normal function in cats. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:1478–1482)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Hansen type I intervertebral disk herniation (IVDH) is the most common cause of acute spinal cord injury in dogs. 1 The pathophysiology described is early-onset intervertebral disk chondroid metaplasia and disk calcification and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Amputation has been used and described as a treatment for small animals facing several limb abnormalities, including developmental deformities, traumatic injury, and neoplasia. 1 – 5 Most patients have good to excellent

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

shell is often fatal but can be medically or surgically repaired depending on the severity of the injury. With respect to wildlife rehabilitation, surgical intervention should only be attempted if it is likely to result in an outcome that allows for the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

the transcobalamin II–cobalamin complex and mediates renal reabsorption and subsequent retention of cobalamin. 3 Dogs with CPV have to been shown to be at risk of developing acute kidney injury at both the tubular and glomerular level. 71 Acute

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

secondary oxidative injury that augments the direct epoxide-mediated damage. Accumulated AFB 1 adducts irreversibly bind to cell enzymes, proteins, and DNA causing impaired metabolism, gene transcription, and protein synthesis. 5 Inhibition of RNA

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

results in laterally directed shear forces being transformed into compression forces, predisposing the physis to compressive injury (Salter-Harris type V). 1 , 8 Premature closure of the distal ulnar physis can be particularly significant, as all

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

diagnosis and potentially lead to fewer injuries to veterinary staff. The trazodone dosage (9 to 12 mg/kg, PO) used in the present study was based on published recommendations, 24 but was higher than that used as an adjunct medication for canine anxiety

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association