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part of the hoof wall from the underlying sensitive tissues when mechanical traction is applied across the lamina. 1 In both horses with naturally occurring and those with experimentally induced laminitis, it is debatable whether any treatment approach

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

shoeing interval were a decrease of 3.3° in hoof angle of the forefeet and a decrease of 3.2° in the hoof angle of the hind feet. Length of the dorsal hoof wall increased by 1.4 cm and 1.5 cm, respectively. 4 On mere geometric analysis, these changes in

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

,6 General shoeing practice is to place nails within the dorsal half of a hoof to allow for expansion of the heels during the stance phase and limb loading. 7 Because a horseshoe is stiffer than the hoof wall, heel expansion during loading would result in

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, those methods are not commonly used in clinical practice to treat horses for laminitis. Laminar temperature has been measured by use of thermography, 5 thermistors housed in stainless steel probes inserted into hoof walls, 2 and 22-gauge hypodermic

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

blood flow in some studies 6,7,9 and decreases in others. 1–6,8,10 In attempts to resolve the controversy of increased versus decreased digital blood flow, recent investigations 3–6,9,10 have included techniques such as scintigraphy, hoof-wall surface

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-Head et al 11 and Hood et al 12 independently determined that this hypoperfusion was accompanied by decreased oxygen delivery to the digital tissues and decreased hoof wall surface temperature, respectively. However, Pollitt et al 13 failed to detect

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

horses to remain free of lameness. 1 Horse owners and trainers have used HBs to maintain their horses’ bare feet and protect the hooves and soles during daily exercise. 1 Also, some clinicians recommend the use of HBs for horses with hoof wall defects

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

proximal portion of the hoof wall as the horse moved 12 (lightweight tactile stimulators); flexible human wrist weights (700 g) wrapped in tape for protection and attached snugly around the hind pasterns by use of fabric hook-and-loop fastener straps and

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

surface of the PSC shoe had 2 treads (30 × 40 × 20 mm) at each quarter. Each shoe was affixed to a hoof with 2 No. 5 horseshoe nails e on each side, and the nail holes in the hoof wall were reused as much as possible to minimize tissue damage. The contact

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

clinical signs (eg, lameness and reluctance to move) and physical examination abnormalities (eg, increased hoof temperature and prominent digital artery pulses); in some cases, radiographic views of affected limbs may reveal divergence of the hoof wall and

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research