Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for :

  • "epidemiology" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, Calif. g. Cobas Mira, Roche Diagnostics, Pleasanton, Calif. h. Interspex Products, San Mateo, Calif. i. Sorbitol dehydrogenase, Roche Molecular Genetics, Palo

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare effects of isoflurane and propofol on the cystometrogram and urethral pressure profile (UPP) in healthy female cats.

Animals—6 healthy female cats.

Procedures—Cats were anesthetized, and a consistent plane of anesthesia was maintained with low and high doses of isoflurane and propofol. A 6-F double-lumen urinary catheter was placed aseptically in the urethra for cystometrogram and UPP measurements. Threshold pressure and volume were recorded for cystometrograms. Maximum urethral pressure for smooth and skeletal muscle portions of the urethra, maximum urethral closure pressure, and functional profile length were measured during each UPP measurement. Heart rate and respiratory rate were recorded.

Results—Cats anesthetized with the low dose of propofol had consistent detrusor reflexes, compared with results for the other anesthetics. Mean ± SD threshold pressure, volume per unit of body weight, and compliance were 75.7 ± 16.3 cm H2O, 8.3 ± 3.2 mL/kg, and 0.5 ± 0.4 mL/cm H2O, respectively, for low-dose propofol. Anesthesia with either dose of propofol caused a significantly higher percentage change in heart rate during the cystometrogram, compared with results for anesthesia with isoflurane. Maximal urethral pressure in the area corresponding to skeletal muscle and the maximum urethral closure pressure were significantly higher for the low dose of propofol, compared with results for the high dose of propofol.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The low-dose propofol regimen was the easiest to titrate and maintain and yielded diagnostic-quality detrusor reflexes in all 6 cats. Anesthetic depth should be titrated appropriately when performing urodynamic procedures.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the in vivo response of α2-adrenoceptors to medetomidine administration in cats with feline idiopathic cystitis (FIC) during periods of stress and after environmental enrichment.

Animals—13 cats with FIC and 12 healthy cats.

Procedures—Cats were subjected to an acute-onset moderate stressor for 8 days. After stress, 20 μg of medetomidine/kg was administered IM on days 1, 3, and 8. Heart rate, blood pressure, pupil diameter, respiratory rate, and level of sedation were evaluated before and after administration of the drug. After day 8, cats were moved to an enriched environment, and tests were repeated on day 35.

Results—Heart rate decreased and pupil diameter increased significantly after medetomidine administration in healthy cats, compared with cats with FIC. Cats with FIC had significantly lower respiratory rates. No significant differences in blood pressure or sedation level were found.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Increased plasma catecholamine concentrations during the enrichment phase, which have been reported elsewhere, may have contributed to the differences in α2-adrenoceptor responses detected in cats with FIC.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare values of urodynamic measurements of cats with idiopathic cystitis (IC) with previously published data for healthy female cats.

Animals—11 female cats with IC.

Procedures—2 sequential cystometrograms and 2 urethral pressure profiles were obtained for each cat. All tracings were evaluated for evidence of overactive urinary bladder (OAB). Maximum urethral pressure (MUP), maximum urethral closure pressure (MUCP), and functional profile length were recorded.

Results—Only 3 cats had obvious micturition events. None of the 11 cats had evidence of OAB. Although not significant, threshold pressure was lower in cats with IC than in healthy cats (mean ± SD, 89.0 ± 12.0 cm H2O vs 75.7 ± 16.3 cm H2O, respectively); however, the total volume infused was significantly lower in cats with IC (4.8 ± 2.1 mL/kg vs 8.3 ± 3.2 mL/kg). The MUCP was significantly higher in cats with IC than in healthy cats (158.0 ± 47.7 cm H2O vs 88.9 ± 23.9 cm H2O, respectively). The MUP was also significantly higher in all portions of the urethra in cats with IC.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—No evidence of OAB was identified in any cat evaluated; therefore, medications used to target this abnormality did not appear justified. The high MUCP in cats with IC suggested that α1-adrenoceptor antagonists or skeletal muscle relaxants may be useful in this disease, and if these data were applicable to male cats, then α1-adrenoceptor antagonism may help prevent recurrent obstructive IC. Further studies are indicated to determine the effects, if any, these drugs might have in cats with IC.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objectives—To determine effects of commonly used diuretic treatments on glomerular filtration rate (GFR), renal blood flow (RBF), and urine output (UO) and compare 2 methods of GFR measurement in healthy awake cats.

Animals—8 healthy cats.

Procedure—In a randomized crossover design, cats were randomly allocated to 4 groups: control; IV administration of fluids; IV administration of fluids and mannitol; and IV administration of fluids, dopamine, and furosemide. Inulin and para-aminohippuric acid were used for determination of plasma clearance for GFR and RBF, respectively. Plasma clearance of technetium-Tc-99m-diethylenetriaminepentacetic acid (99mTc-DTPA) was also used for GFR determination.

Results—Furosemide-dopamine induced the largest UO, compared with other groups. Both mannitol and fluid therapy increased RBF, compared with the control group. Mannitol, and not fluid therapy, increased RBF, compared with furosemide-dopamine. There were significant differences in GFR values calculated from 99mTc-DTPA and inulin clearances between the 2 groups. In all groups, use of 99mTc-DTPA caused underestimation of GFR, compared with use of inulin.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In healthy awake cats, administration of furosemide-dopamine did not increase GFR or RBF despite increased UO. Fluid therapy and fluid therapy plus mannitol improved RBF. Determination of GFR by use of 99mTc-DTPA cannot always be substituted for inulin clearance when accurate measurement is required.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, 1984 ; 31 . 2. Ross SJ Osborne CA Lulich JP , et al. Canine and feline nephrolithiasis. Epidemiology, detection and management . Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 1999 ; 29 : 231 – 250 . 10.1016/S0195-5616(99)50013-2 3. Cannon AB

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, Park E , Urinary IL-6 is elevated in patients with urolithiasis . J Urol 1998 ; 160 : 2284 – 2288 . 10.1016/S0022-5347(01)62311-5 21. Ortega M , Marco F , Soriano A , Epidemiology and prognostic determinants of bacteraemic catheter

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Kagen DI , et al. Concentrations of specific epithelial growth factors in the urine of interstitial cystitis patients and controls . J Urol 1997 ; 158 : 1983 – 1988 . 10.1016/S0022-5347(01)64198-3 9. Oravisto KJ . Epidemiology of

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research