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Abstract

Objective—To investigate the effects of bevacizumab, a human monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor, on the angiogenesis and growth of canine osteosarcoma cells xenografted in mice.

Animals—27 athymic nude mice.

Procedures—To each mouse, highly metastasizing parent osteosarcoma cells of canine origin were injected into the left gastrocnemius muscle. Each mouse was then randomly allocated to 1 of 3 treatment groups: high-dose bevacizumab (4 mg/kg, IP), low-dose bevacizumab (2 mg/kg, IP), or control (no treatment). Tumor growth (the number of days required for the tumor to grow from 8 to 13 mm), vasculature, histomorphology, necrosis, and pulmonary metastasis were evaluated.

Results—Mice in the high-dose bevacizumab group had significantly delayed tumor growth (mean ± SD, 13.4 ± 3.8 days; range, 9 to 21 days), compared with that for mice in the low-dose bevacizumab group (mean ± SD, 9.4 ± 1.5 days; range, 7 to 11 days) or control group (mean ± SD, 7. 2 ± 1.5 days; range, 4 to 9 days). Mice in the low-dose bevacizumab group also had significantly delayed tumor growth, compared with that for mice in the control group.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that bevacizumab inhibited growth of canine osteosarcoma cells xenografted in mice, which suggested that vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors may be clinically useful for the treatment of osteosarcoma in dogs.

Impact for Human Medicine—Canine osteosarcoma is used as a research model for human osteosarcoma; therefore, bevacizumab may be clinically beneficial for the treatment of osteosarcoma in humans.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Hendrick MJ Goldschmidt MH Shofer FS , et al. Postvaccinal sarcomas in the cat: epidemiology and electron probe microanalytical identification of aluminum . Cancer Res 1992 ; 52 : 5391 – 5394 . 6 Doddy FD Glickman LT

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

CJ Hahn AW , et al. Hormonal and sex impact on the epidemiology of canine lymphoma [published online ahead of print Mar 14, 2010] . J Cancer Epidemiol doi:10.1155/2009/591753. 14. Rassnick KM McEntee MC Erb HN , et al. Comparison

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

epidemiology of bladder cancer . Nat Clin Pract Urol 2006 ; 3 : 327 – 340 . 10.1038/ncpuro0510 44. West DA Cummings JM Longo WE , et al. Role of chronic catheterization in the development of bladder cancer in patients with spinal cord injury

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, Chicago, Ill. References 1 Dorn CR Taylor DO Schneider R . The epidemiology of canine leukemia and lymphoma . Bibl Haematol 1970 ; 36 : 403 – 415 . 2 Dobson JM Blackwood LB McInnes EF , et al. Prognostic variables in

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research